Open Textbooks and Social Justice: Open Educational Practices to Address Economic, Cultural and Political Injustice at the University of Cape Town

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Cox, Glenda
dc.contributor.author Masuku, Bianca
dc.contributor.author Willmers, Michelle
dc.date.accessioned 2020-05-15T10:30:19Z
dc.date.available 2020-05-15T10:30:19Z
dc.date.issued 2020-05
dc.identifier.citation Cox, G., Masuku, B. & Willmers, M. 2020. Open Textbooks and Social Justice: Open Educational Practices to Address Economic, Cultural and Political Injustice at the University of Cape Town. <i>Journal of Interactive Media in Education.</i> 2020(1)(2):pp. 1–10. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri https://doi.org/10.5334/jime.556
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/11427/31887
dc.description.abstract This paper provides evidence from the Digital Open Textbooks for Development (DOT4D) project at the University of Cape Town (UCT), on the potential of open textbooks to address social injustice in South African higher education and the practices utilised by UCT staff to address these challenges. The paper uses Nancy Fraser’s (2005) trivalent lens to examine inequality, specifically as relates to the following dimensions: economic (maldistribution of resources); cultural (misrecognition of culture and identities); and political (misrepresentation or exclusion of voice). The findings demonstrate that open textbooks have the potential to disrupt histories of exclusion in South African higher education institutions by addressing issues of cost and marginalisation through the creation of affordable, contextually-relevant learning resources. In addition to this, they provide affordances which enable lecturers to change the way they teach, include student voices and create innovative pedagogical strategies. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en_US
dc.source Journal of Interactive Media in Education en_US
dc.source.uri https://jime.open.ac.uk/
dc.subject open education en_US
dc.subject open textbooks
dc.subject social justice
dc.subject transformation
dc.title Open Textbooks and Social Justice: Open Educational Practices to Address Economic, Cultural and Political Injustice at the University of Cape Town en_US
dc.type Journal Article en_US
dc.publisher.faculty Centre for Higher Education Development en_US
dc.publisher.department CILT en_US
dc.source.journalvolume 2020(1) en_US
dc.source.journalissue 2 en_US
dc.source.pagination pp. 1–10 en_US
dc.identifier.apacitation Cox, G., Masuku, B., & Willmers, M. (2020). Open Textbooks and Social Justice: Open Educational Practices to Address Economic, Cultural and Political Injustice at the University of Cape Town. <i>Journal of Interactive Media in Education</i>, 2020(1)(2), pp. 1–10. en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Cox, Glenda, Bianca Masuku, and Michelle Willmers "Open Textbooks and Social Justice: Open Educational Practices to Address Economic, Cultural and Political Injustice at the University of Cape Town." <i>Journal of Interactive Media in Education</i> 2020(1), 2. (2020): pp. 1–10. en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Cox G, Masuku B, Willmers M. Open Textbooks and Social Justice: Open Educational Practices to Address Economic, Cultural and Political Injustice at the University of Cape Town. Journal of Interactive Media in Education. 2020;2020(1)(2):pp. 1–10. . en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Cox, Glenda AU - Masuku, Bianca AU - Willmers, Michelle AB - This paper provides evidence from the Digital Open Textbooks for Development (DOT4D) project at the University of Cape Town (UCT), on the potential of open textbooks to address social injustice in South African higher education and the practices utilised by UCT staff to address these challenges. The paper uses Nancy Fraser’s (2005) trivalent lens to examine inequality, specifically as relates to the following dimensions: economic (maldistribution of resources); cultural (misrecognition of culture and identities); and political (misrepresentation or exclusion of voice). The findings demonstrate that open textbooks have the potential to disrupt histories of exclusion in South African higher education institutions by addressing issues of cost and marginalisation through the creation of affordable, contextually-relevant learning resources. In addition to this, they provide affordances which enable lecturers to change the way they teach, include student voices and create innovative pedagogical strategies. DA - 2020-05 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town IS - 2 J1 - Journal of Interactive Media in Education KW - open education; open textbooks; social justice; transformation LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PY - 2020 T1 - Open Textbooks and Social Justice: Open Educational Practices to Address Economic, Cultural and Political Injustice at the University of Cape Town TI - Open Textbooks and Social Justice: Open Educational Practices to Address Economic, Cultural and Political Injustice at the University of Cape Town UR - ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/