Building evidence for improving childhood immunisation coverage in Africa.

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Hussey, Gregory D en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Schoub, Barry D en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Wiysonge, Shey Umaru Charles en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-07-28T14:58:33Z
dc.date.available 2014-07-28T14:58:33Z
dc.date.issued 2012 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Wiysonge, S. 2012. Building evidence for improving childhood immunisation coverage in Africa. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/3183
dc.description Includes abstract.
dc.description Includes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstract The Expanded Programme on Immunisation has the potential to substantially reduce child mortality and contribute to achieving the Millennium Development Goals. We assessed the programme’s performance in Africa, the reasons for poor performance, and effective interventions for improving its performance on the continent. We used a combination of methods including systematic reviews, bibliometric analyses, generalised linear models, and grading of the quality of evidence. We found that African countries have made extraordinary advances since childhood immunisation programmes began in 1974. However, there exist wide inter-country and intra-country differences, and the quality of immunisation data is poor. Besides, vaccines are administered well after the recommended ages in many countries; leaving children exposed to deadly vaccine-preventable diseases for long periods. In addition, Africa’s contribution to the global immunisation research output is minimal. There is no association between research productivity and immunisation coverage in Africa, which may signal lack of interactive communication between policymakers and researchers. Furthermore, individual and contextual factors (defined at community and country levels) are independently associated with low immunisation coverage; suggesting that immunisation system strengthening should address people and the communities and societies in which they live. Lastly, we found moderate-to-high quality evidence that interactive educational meetings, audit and feedback, supportive supervision; and use of community health workers, parent reminders, home visits, interactive communication, mass media, and material incentives have the potential to improve childhood immunisation coverage in Africa. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Clinical Laboratory Sciences en_ZA
dc.title Building evidence for improving childhood immunisation coverage in Africa. en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Wiysonge, S. U. C. (2012). <i>Building evidence for improving childhood immunisation coverage in Africa</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/3183 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Wiysonge, Shey Umaru Charles. <i>"Building evidence for improving childhood immunisation coverage in Africa."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, 2012. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/3183 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Wiysonge SUC. Building evidence for improving childhood immunisation coverage in Africa. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, 2012 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/3183 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Wiysonge, Shey Umaru Charles AB - The Expanded Programme on Immunisation has the potential to substantially reduce child mortality and contribute to achieving the Millennium Development Goals. We assessed the programme’s performance in Africa, the reasons for poor performance, and effective interventions for improving its performance on the continent. We used a combination of methods including systematic reviews, bibliometric analyses, generalised linear models, and grading of the quality of evidence. We found that African countries have made extraordinary advances since childhood immunisation programmes began in 1974. However, there exist wide inter-country and intra-country differences, and the quality of immunisation data is poor. Besides, vaccines are administered well after the recommended ages in many countries; leaving children exposed to deadly vaccine-preventable diseases for long periods. In addition, Africa’s contribution to the global immunisation research output is minimal. There is no association between research productivity and immunisation coverage in Africa, which may signal lack of interactive communication between policymakers and researchers. Furthermore, individual and contextual factors (defined at community and country levels) are independently associated with low immunisation coverage; suggesting that immunisation system strengthening should address people and the communities and societies in which they live. Lastly, we found moderate-to-high quality evidence that interactive educational meetings, audit and feedback, supportive supervision; and use of community health workers, parent reminders, home visits, interactive communication, mass media, and material incentives have the potential to improve childhood immunisation coverage in Africa. DA - 2012 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2012 T1 - Building evidence for improving childhood immunisation coverage in Africa TI - Building evidence for improving childhood immunisation coverage in Africa UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/3183 ER - en_ZA


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