“Facing both ways” an investigation of the mix of situated knowledge and formal knowledge in boat building

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Gambie, Jeanne
dc.contributor.author Davidson, Vanessa
dc.date.accessioned 2019-08-23T13:22:15Z
dc.date.available 2019-08-23T13:22:15Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.citation Davidson, V. 2019. “Facing both ways” an investigation of the mix of situated knowledge and formal knowledge in boat building. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/30505
dc.description.abstract This study looks at vocational curriculum and pedagogy within the context of internal knowledge structures. Focused on a South African boat building qualification, to determine the nature of the qualification and the enacted curriculum with respect to the type of knowledge required in boat building labour processes. In particular the study focuses on the dual demands of innovation and reproduction in a global context. The study attempts to broaden two empirical studies done by Gamble (2004) and Coetzee (2011) into cabinet making and train driving respectively, and an HSRC commissioned study (2015) into artisanal work of the future. The study develops a conceptual framework of the logic of boat building work that meets the dual demands of innovation and reproduction. The conceptual framework develops the hypothesis that different types of knowledge are required to meet the competing demands of ‘innovation’ and ‘reproduction’. To explore the hypothesis, a labour process analysis is undertaken and then the structure and content of the qualification is examined using a coding device re-contextualised from a four-way knowledge schema developed by Gamble (2016a,) as well as an examination of the workshop component of the learnership and the learning material. The study finds that the curriculum attempts to teach in an old craft-based method of apprenticeship. It also finds that the qualification addresses the procedural and sequential requirements of boat building. The problem is that while this addresses the historical craft-based aspects of the trade, it does not support technological innovation. In conclusion, the contribution of this study is to the importance of knowledge in vocational education and, in particular theoretical scientific knowledge and, the role it plays in vocational qualifications and curriculum in a technologically developing world.
dc.subject Education
dc.title “Facing both ways” an investigation of the mix of situated knowledge and formal knowledge in boat building
dc.type Master Thesis
dc.date.updated 2019-08-23T09:47:27Z
dc.language.rfc3066 Eng
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities
dc.publisher.department School of Education
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname Master of Philosophy
dc.identifier.apacitation Davidson, V. (2019). <i>“Facing both ways” an investigation of the mix of situated knowledge and formal knowledge in boat building</i>. (). ,Faculty of Humanities ,School of Education. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/30505 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Davidson, Vanessa. <i>"“Facing both ways” an investigation of the mix of situated knowledge and formal knowledge in boat building."</i> ., ,Faculty of Humanities ,School of Education, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/30505 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Davidson V. “Facing both ways” an investigation of the mix of situated knowledge and formal knowledge in boat building. []. ,Faculty of Humanities ,School of Education, 2019 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/30505 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Davidson, Vanessa AB - This study looks at vocational curriculum and pedagogy within the context of internal knowledge structures. Focused on a South African boat building qualification, to determine the nature of the qualification and the enacted curriculum with respect to the type of knowledge required in boat building labour processes. In particular the study focuses on the dual demands of innovation and reproduction in a global context. The study attempts to broaden two empirical studies done by Gamble (2004) and Coetzee (2011) into cabinet making and train driving respectively, and an HSRC commissioned study (2015) into artisanal work of the future. The study develops a conceptual framework of the logic of boat building work that meets the dual demands of innovation and reproduction. The conceptual framework develops the hypothesis that different types of knowledge are required to meet the competing demands of ‘innovation’ and ‘reproduction’. To explore the hypothesis, a labour process analysis is undertaken and then the structure and content of the qualification is examined using a coding device re-contextualised from a four-way knowledge schema developed by Gamble (2016a,) as well as an examination of the workshop component of the learnership and the learning material. The study finds that the curriculum attempts to teach in an old craft-based method of apprenticeship. It also finds that the qualification addresses the procedural and sequential requirements of boat building. The problem is that while this addresses the historical craft-based aspects of the trade, it does not support technological innovation. In conclusion, the contribution of this study is to the importance of knowledge in vocational education and, in particular theoretical scientific knowledge and, the role it plays in vocational qualifications and curriculum in a technologically developing world. DA - 2019 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town KW - Education LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PY - 2019 T1 - “Facing both ways” an investigation of the mix of situated knowledge and formal knowledge in boat building TI - “Facing both ways” an investigation of the mix of situated knowledge and formal knowledge in boat building UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/30505 ER - en_ZA


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