Documenting of care arrangements for children of mothers admitted to a psychiatric hospital: A South African case study

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Schneider, Marguerite
dc.contributor.author Dawood, Nisaar Ahmed
dc.date.accessioned 2019-02-19T12:48:33Z
dc.date.available 2019-02-19T12:48:33Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Dawood, N. 2018. Documenting of care arrangements for children of mothers admitted to a psychiatric hospital: A South African case study. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/29655
dc.description.abstract Background: Enquiring about and documenting care arrangements for children of inpatient mothers with mental illness is paramount. Failure to do so could have a negative impact on the well-being of their children. Documenting care arrangements on admission signals good practice on the part of the admitting medical staff and ensures compliance with the requirements of the South African Children’s Act of 2004. This study explores the current practice at a large government run tertiary female inpatient psychiatric unit in Cape Town, regarding the enquiring and documenting practice within the first 24 hours of admission, of these care arrangements. Methods: The study is a cross sectional study using a mixed methods approach including: i) a case note audit of 100 consecutive patient folders examining the documentation of care arrangements within the first 24 hours of admission and ii) a structured self-administered questionnaire to professional staff working on the unit. Results: A total of 87 clinical folders were audited. Ninety nine percent of these folders had written down in them whether the women had children or not. Fifty eight percent of women had minor children and had 87 children between them. Fifteen percent of women had no care arrangements documented and 20% of women had unclear documentation of care arrangements. Fifteen completed staff questionnaires were returned. All staff agreed that it was important to ask the mothers about care arrangements. Conclusion: Significant more women that those identified on admission may have children who may have been in unsafe care arrangements at the time of their admission. There is room for improving the clarity of documenting of care arrangements and the enquiring into the specific care arrangements.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subject.other Psychiatry
dc.title Documenting of care arrangements for children of mothers admitted to a psychiatric hospital: A South African case study
dc.type Master Thesis
dc.date.updated 2019-02-19T12:35:08Z
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences
dc.publisher.department Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MMed
dc.identifier.apacitation Dawood, N. A. (2018). <i>Documenting of care arrangements for children of mothers admitted to a psychiatric hospital: A South African case study</i>. (). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/29655 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Dawood, Nisaar Ahmed. <i>"Documenting of care arrangements for children of mothers admitted to a psychiatric hospital: A South African case study."</i> ., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, 2018. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/29655 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Dawood NA. Documenting of care arrangements for children of mothers admitted to a psychiatric hospital: A South African case study. []. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, 2018 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/29655 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Dawood, Nisaar Ahmed AB - Background: Enquiring about and documenting care arrangements for children of inpatient mothers with mental illness is paramount. Failure to do so could have a negative impact on the well-being of their children. Documenting care arrangements on admission signals good practice on the part of the admitting medical staff and ensures compliance with the requirements of the South African Children’s Act of 2004. This study explores the current practice at a large government run tertiary female inpatient psychiatric unit in Cape Town, regarding the enquiring and documenting practice within the first 24 hours of admission, of these care arrangements. Methods: The study is a cross sectional study using a mixed methods approach including: i) a case note audit of 100 consecutive patient folders examining the documentation of care arrangements within the first 24 hours of admission and ii) a structured self-administered questionnaire to professional staff working on the unit. Results: A total of 87 clinical folders were audited. Ninety nine percent of these folders had written down in them whether the women had children or not. Fifty eight percent of women had minor children and had 87 children between them. Fifteen percent of women had no care arrangements documented and 20% of women had unclear documentation of care arrangements. Fifteen completed staff questionnaires were returned. All staff agreed that it was important to ask the mothers about care arrangements. Conclusion: Significant more women that those identified on admission may have children who may have been in unsafe care arrangements at the time of their admission. There is room for improving the clarity of documenting of care arrangements and the enquiring into the specific care arrangements. DA - 2018 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2018 T1 - Documenting of care arrangements for children of mothers admitted to a psychiatric hospital: A South African case study TI - Documenting of care arrangements for children of mothers admitted to a psychiatric hospital: A South African case study UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/29655 ER - en_ZA


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