Chains of memory in the postcolony: performing and remembering the Namibian genocide

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Baxter, Veronica
dc.contributor.advisor Lentz, Carola
dc.contributor.author Maedza, Pedzisai
dc.date.accessioned 2019-02-04T11:09:29Z
dc.date.available 2019-02-04T11:09:29Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Maedza, P. 2018. Chains of memory in the postcolony: performing and remembering the Namibian genocide. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/29210
dc.description.abstract This research project is an interdisciplinary investigation of the memory of the 1904-1908 Namibian genocide through its performance representation(s). It lies at the intersection of performance, memory and genocide studies. The research considers the role of performance in remembering, memorialising, commemorating, contesting, transmitting and sustaining the memory of the genocide across time and place. The project frames performance as a media through which history is narrated by positioning performance as a complex interlocutor of the past in the present. This claim is premised on the assumption that the past is not simply given in memory ‘but it must be articulated to become memory’ (Huyssen, 1995:3). The research considers commemoration events and processes as fruitful performance nodes to uncover the past as well as the politics of the present. It makes the case that while the Namibian genocide has so far been denied official or state acknowledgement, it is chiefly through the medium of performance that the genocide memory is remembered, contested and performed. The project offers a variety of perspectives on the relationship between genocide violence, memory and space by focusing on what is remembered, how it is remembered and by paying attention to when it is remembered. The research contributes to an understanding and reconstruction of memory and performance of the Namibian genocide on two fronts. Firstly, as a cultural phenomenon and secondly, as a form of elegy and memorial in contemporary times. These insights contribute to the emerging body of scholarly work on performance and the cultural memory of the Namibian genocide. The project also charts avenues of inquiry in the production and transmission of memory across time and generations, within and beyond Namibian national borders. It pays close attention to performance’s contribution to the formation of cultural memory by exploring the conditions and factors that make remembering in common possible such as language, images, rituals, commemoration practices, exhibitions, theatre and sites of memories. Through examining the specific role of performance as a medium of cultural memory of the Namibian genocide the study considers ‘memory as performing history’ (Shuttleworth et al., 2000:8). The research interrogates how contemporary artistic performance representations and interpretations from within and outside of Namibia inform the way societal history and the present are presented and remembered. Performance becomes an aperture to investigate the enduring contemporary role of the memory of the Namibian genocide as well as its simultaneous reconfiguration. This enables the project to investigate how memories circulate across time and place - transnationally and across generations. This cross-border and transgenerational reflection is essential to understanding how the Namibian genocide has and is articulated, circulated, structured and remembered through performance in the postcolony.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subject.other Theatre, Dance and Performance
dc.title Chains of memory in the postcolony: performing and remembering the Namibian genocide
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
dc.date.updated 2019-02-04T09:23:33Z
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities
dc.publisher.department Department of Drama
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD
dc.identifier.apacitation Maedza, P. (2018). <i>Chains of memory in the postcolony: performing and remembering the Namibian genocide</i>. (). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Drama. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/29210 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Maedza, Pedzisai. <i>"Chains of memory in the postcolony: performing and remembering the Namibian genocide."</i> ., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Drama, 2018. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/29210 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Maedza P. Chains of memory in the postcolony: performing and remembering the Namibian genocide. []. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Drama, 2018 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/29210 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Maedza, Pedzisai AB - This research project is an interdisciplinary investigation of the memory of the 1904-1908 Namibian genocide through its performance representation(s). It lies at the intersection of performance, memory and genocide studies. The research considers the role of performance in remembering, memorialising, commemorating, contesting, transmitting and sustaining the memory of the genocide across time and place. The project frames performance as a media through which history is narrated by positioning performance as a complex interlocutor of the past in the present. This claim is premised on the assumption that the past is not simply given in memory ‘but it must be articulated to become memory’ (Huyssen, 1995:3). The research considers commemoration events and processes as fruitful performance nodes to uncover the past as well as the politics of the present. It makes the case that while the Namibian genocide has so far been denied official or state acknowledgement, it is chiefly through the medium of performance that the genocide memory is remembered, contested and performed. The project offers a variety of perspectives on the relationship between genocide violence, memory and space by focusing on what is remembered, how it is remembered and by paying attention to when it is remembered. The research contributes to an understanding and reconstruction of memory and performance of the Namibian genocide on two fronts. Firstly, as a cultural phenomenon and secondly, as a form of elegy and memorial in contemporary times. These insights contribute to the emerging body of scholarly work on performance and the cultural memory of the Namibian genocide. The project also charts avenues of inquiry in the production and transmission of memory across time and generations, within and beyond Namibian national borders. It pays close attention to performance’s contribution to the formation of cultural memory by exploring the conditions and factors that make remembering in common possible such as language, images, rituals, commemoration practices, exhibitions, theatre and sites of memories. Through examining the specific role of performance as a medium of cultural memory of the Namibian genocide the study considers ‘memory as performing history’ (Shuttleworth et al., 2000:8). The research interrogates how contemporary artistic performance representations and interpretations from within and outside of Namibia inform the way societal history and the present are presented and remembered. Performance becomes an aperture to investigate the enduring contemporary role of the memory of the Namibian genocide as well as its simultaneous reconfiguration. This enables the project to investigate how memories circulate across time and place - transnationally and across generations. This cross-border and transgenerational reflection is essential to understanding how the Namibian genocide has and is articulated, circulated, structured and remembered through performance in the postcolony. DA - 2018 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2018 T1 - Chains of memory in the postcolony: performing and remembering the Namibian genocide TI - Chains of memory in the postcolony: performing and remembering the Namibian genocide UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/29210 ER - en_ZA


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