Profiling the mental health of diabetic patients: a cross-sectional survey of Zimbabwean patients

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Nyoni, Alima M
dc.contributor.author Chiwaridzo, Matthew
dc.contributor.author Tadyanemhandu, Catherine
dc.contributor.author January, James
dc.contributor.author Dambi, Jermaine M
dc.date.accessioned 2018-11-13T09:59:39Z
dc.date.available 2018-11-13T09:59:39Z
dc.date.issued 2018-10-29
dc.identifier.citation BMC Research Notes. 2018 Oct 29;11(1):772
dc.identifier.uri https://doi.org/10.1186/s13104-018-3881-9
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/29061
dc.description.abstract Objective The burden of diabetes mellitus has exponentially increased in low resource settings. Patients with diabetes are more likely to exhibit poor mental health which negatively affects treatment outcomes. However, patients with high levels of social support (SS) are likely to report optimal mental health. We sought to determine how SS affects the report of psychiatric morbidity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in 108 diabetic patients in Harare, Zimbabwe. Results The average age of participants was 54.1 (SD 18.6) years. Most of the participants were; females (69.4%), married (51.9%), and were of low level of income (43.5%). 37.1% of the participants exhibited signs of psychiatric morbidity [mean Shona Symptoms Questionnaire score—6.7 (SD 3.2)]. Further, patients also reported lower HRQoL [mean EQ-5D-VAS score—64.1 (SD 15.3)] and high levels of SS [mean Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support score—43.7 (SD 11.5)]. Patients who received greater amount of SS had optimal mental health. Being female, unmarried, lower education attainment, having more comorbid conditions, being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and having been diagnosed of diabetes for a longer duration were associated with poorer mental health. It is important to develop context-specific interventions to improve diabetic patients’ mental health.
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher BioMed Central
dc.source BMC Res Notes
dc.source.uri https://bmcresnotes.biomedcentral.com/
dc.subject.other Diabetes
dc.subject.other Mental health
dc.subject.other Social support
dc.subject.other Quality of life
dc.subject.other Zimbabwe
dc.title Profiling the mental health of diabetic patients: a cross-sectional survey of Zimbabwean patients
dc.type Journal Article
dc.date.updated 2018-11-04T04:43:04Z
dc.rights.holder The Author(s)
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Nyoni, A. M., Chiwaridzo, M., Tadyanemhandu, C., January, J., & Dambi, J. M. (2018). Profiling the mental health of diabetic patients: a cross-sectional survey of Zimbabwean patients. <i>BMC Res Notes</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/29061 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Nyoni, Alima M, Matthew Chiwaridzo, Catherine Tadyanemhandu, James January, and Jermaine M Dambi "Profiling the mental health of diabetic patients: a cross-sectional survey of Zimbabwean patients." <i>BMC Res Notes</i> (2018) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/29061 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Nyoni AM, Chiwaridzo M, Tadyanemhandu C, January J, Dambi JM. Profiling the mental health of diabetic patients: a cross-sectional survey of Zimbabwean patients. BMC Res Notes. 2018; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/29061. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Nyoni, Alima M AU - Chiwaridzo, Matthew AU - Tadyanemhandu, Catherine AU - January, James AU - Dambi, Jermaine M AB - Objective The burden of diabetes mellitus has exponentially increased in low resource settings. Patients with diabetes are more likely to exhibit poor mental health which negatively affects treatment outcomes. However, patients with high levels of social support (SS) are likely to report optimal mental health. We sought to determine how SS affects the report of psychiatric morbidity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in 108 diabetic patients in Harare, Zimbabwe. Results The average age of participants was 54.1 (SD 18.6) years. Most of the participants were; females (69.4%), married (51.9%), and were of low level of income (43.5%). 37.1% of the participants exhibited signs of psychiatric morbidity [mean Shona Symptoms Questionnaire score—6.7 (SD 3.2)]. Further, patients also reported lower HRQoL [mean EQ-5D-VAS score—64.1 (SD 15.3)] and high levels of SS [mean Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support score—43.7 (SD 11.5)]. Patients who received greater amount of SS had optimal mental health. Being female, unmarried, lower education attainment, having more comorbid conditions, being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and having been diagnosed of diabetes for a longer duration were associated with poorer mental health. It is important to develop context-specific interventions to improve diabetic patients’ mental health. DA - 2018-10-29 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - BMC Res Notes LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2018 T1 - Profiling the mental health of diabetic patients: a cross-sectional survey of Zimbabwean patients TI - Profiling the mental health of diabetic patients: a cross-sectional survey of Zimbabwean patients UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/29061 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record