Implementing large-scale health system strengthening interventions: experience from the better health outcomes through mentoring and assessments (BHOMA) project in Zambia

 

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dc.contributor.author Mutale, Wilbroad
dc.contributor.author Cleary, Susan
dc.contributor.author Olivier, Jill
dc.contributor.author Chilengi, Roma
dc.contributor.author Gilson, Lucy
dc.date.accessioned 2018-10-22T10:44:32Z
dc.date.available 2018-10-22T10:44:32Z
dc.date.issued 2018-10-19
dc.identifier.citation Mutale, W., Cleary, S., Olivier, J., Chilengi, R. & Gilson, L. 2018. Implementing large-scale health system strengthening interventions: experience from the better health outcomes through mentoring and assessments (BHOMA) project in Zambia. BMC Health Services Research. 18(1):795.
dc.identifier.uri https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-018-3619-3
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/28941
dc.description.abstract Background Under the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation’s African Health Initiative, five Population Health Implementation and Training partnerships were established as long-term health system strengthening projects in five Sub-Saharan Countries. In Zambia, the Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia began to implement the Better Health Outcomes through Mentorship and Assessments (BHOMA) in 2009. This was a combined community and health systems project involving 42 public facilities and their catchment populations. The impact of this intervention is reported elsewhere, but less attention has been paid to evaluation approaches that generate an understanding of the forces shaping the intervention. This paper is focused on understanding the implementation practices of the BHOMA intervention in Zambia. Methods Qualitative approaches were employed to understand and explain health systems intervention implementation practices between 2014 and 2016. We purposively sampled six clinics out of the 42 that participated in the BHOMA project within three districts of Lusaka province in Zambia. At the facility-level we targeted health centre in-charges, health workers, and community health workers. In-depth interviews (n = 22), focus group discussions (n = 3) and observations were also collected and synthesised. Results The major health system challenges addressed by the BHOMA project included poor infrastructure, lack of human resources, poor service delivery, long distances to health centres and inadequate health information systems. In order to implement this in the districts it was necessary to engage with the Ministry of Health and district managers, however, these partners were not actively engaged in intervention design There was great variation in perceptions about the BHOMA interventions. The implementation team considered BHOMA as a ‘proof of concept pilot project’, running parallel to the public health system, while district health officials from the Ministry of health understood it as a ‘long term partner’ and were therefore resistant to the short-term nature of the intervention. Conclusions The Normalization Process Theory provided a useful framework to understand and explain implementation processes for the BHOMA intervention in Zambia. We clearly demonstrated the applicability of all the four main components of the NPT: coherence (or sense-making); cognitive participation (or engagement); collective action and reflexive monitoring. We demonstrated how complex and dynamic the intervention played out among different actors and how implementation was affected by difference in appreciation and interpretation of the goal of the intervention. Our findings support the growing demand for process evaluations to use theory based approaches to examine how context interact with local interventions to affect outcomes intended or not. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01942278 . Registered: September 13, 2013 (Retrospectively registered).
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher BioMed Central
dc.source BMC Health Services Research
dc.source.uri https://bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com/
dc.subject.other Health system
dc.subject.other Implementation
dc.subject.other Zambia
dc.subject.other Information system
dc.title Implementing large-scale health system strengthening interventions: experience from the better health outcomes through mentoring and assessments (BHOMA) project in Zambia
dc.type Journal Article
dc.date.updated 2018-10-21T03:18:24Z
dc.rights.holder The Author(s).
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Public Health and Family Medicine en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Mutale, W., Cleary, S., Olivier, J., Chilengi, R., & Gilson, L. (2018). Implementing large-scale health system strengthening interventions: experience from the better health outcomes through mentoring and assessments (BHOMA) project in Zambia. <i>BMC Health Services Research</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/28941 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Mutale, Wilbroad, Susan Cleary, Jill Olivier, Roma Chilengi, and Lucy Gilson "Implementing large-scale health system strengthening interventions: experience from the better health outcomes through mentoring and assessments (BHOMA) project in Zambia." <i>BMC Health Services Research</i> (2018) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/28941 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Mutale W, Cleary S, Olivier J, Chilengi R, Gilson L. Implementing large-scale health system strengthening interventions: experience from the better health outcomes through mentoring and assessments (BHOMA) project in Zambia. BMC Health Services Research. 2018; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/28941. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Mutale, Wilbroad AU - Cleary, Susan AU - Olivier, Jill AU - Chilengi, Roma AU - Gilson, Lucy AB - Background Under the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation’s African Health Initiative, five Population Health Implementation and Training partnerships were established as long-term health system strengthening projects in five Sub-Saharan Countries. In Zambia, the Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia began to implement the Better Health Outcomes through Mentorship and Assessments (BHOMA) in 2009. This was a combined community and health systems project involving 42 public facilities and their catchment populations. The impact of this intervention is reported elsewhere, but less attention has been paid to evaluation approaches that generate an understanding of the forces shaping the intervention. This paper is focused on understanding the implementation practices of the BHOMA intervention in Zambia. Methods Qualitative approaches were employed to understand and explain health systems intervention implementation practices between 2014 and 2016. We purposively sampled six clinics out of the 42 that participated in the BHOMA project within three districts of Lusaka province in Zambia. At the facility-level we targeted health centre in-charges, health workers, and community health workers. In-depth interviews (n = 22), focus group discussions (n = 3) and observations were also collected and synthesised. Results The major health system challenges addressed by the BHOMA project included poor infrastructure, lack of human resources, poor service delivery, long distances to health centres and inadequate health information systems. In order to implement this in the districts it was necessary to engage with the Ministry of Health and district managers, however, these partners were not actively engaged in intervention design There was great variation in perceptions about the BHOMA interventions. The implementation team considered BHOMA as a ‘proof of concept pilot project’, running parallel to the public health system, while district health officials from the Ministry of health understood it as a ‘long term partner’ and were therefore resistant to the short-term nature of the intervention. Conclusions The Normalization Process Theory provided a useful framework to understand and explain implementation processes for the BHOMA intervention in Zambia. We clearly demonstrated the applicability of all the four main components of the NPT: coherence (or sense-making); cognitive participation (or engagement); collective action and reflexive monitoring. We demonstrated how complex and dynamic the intervention played out among different actors and how implementation was affected by difference in appreciation and interpretation of the goal of the intervention. Our findings support the growing demand for process evaluations to use theory based approaches to examine how context interact with local interventions to affect outcomes intended or not. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01942278 . Registered: September 13, 2013 (Retrospectively registered). DA - 2018-10-19 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - BMC Health Services Research LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2018 T1 - Implementing large-scale health system strengthening interventions: experience from the better health outcomes through mentoring and assessments (BHOMA) project in Zambia TI - Implementing large-scale health system strengthening interventions: experience from the better health outcomes through mentoring and assessments (BHOMA) project in Zambia UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/28941 ER - en_ZA


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