Paediatric procedural sedation current practice and challenges in Cape Town

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Hodkinson, PW en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Wallis, LA en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Burger, Adrian en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-07-28T14:26:17Z
dc.date.available 2014-07-28T14:26:17Z
dc.date.issued 2012 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Burger, A. 2012. Paediatric procedural sedation current practice and challenges in Cape Town. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/2857
dc.description Includes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstract Children often present to the Emergency Centre (EC) with painful injuries, or conditions which require painful or upsetting interventions to diagnose or treat. Procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) refers to the pharmacologic technique of managing the child’s pain and anxiety. The appropriate management of pain and anxiety in the EC is a significant facet of emergency care for all patients, especially in paediatric patients.1 This is achieved partly by the administration of sedative, dissociative, or analgesic drugs which alter awareness, completely sedate the patient, reduce or eliminate pain.2,3,4 PSA is an essential component of Emergency Medicine practice and is a core skill acquired in Emergency Medicine training programs. There is good evidence that proactively addressing pain and anxiety may improve quality of care and patient satisfaction by facilitating interventional procedures and minimizing patient suffering.5 en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Emergency Medicine en_ZA
dc.title Paediatric procedural sedation current practice and challenges in Cape Town en_ZA
dc.type Masters Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Division of Emergency Medicine en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MMed en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Burger, A. (2012). <i>Paediatric procedural sedation current practice and challenges in Cape Town</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Division of Emergency Medicine. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/2857 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Burger, Adrian. <i>"Paediatric procedural sedation current practice and challenges in Cape Town."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Division of Emergency Medicine, 2012. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/2857 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Burger A. Paediatric procedural sedation current practice and challenges in Cape Town. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Division of Emergency Medicine, 2012 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/2857 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Burger, Adrian AB - Children often present to the Emergency Centre (EC) with painful injuries, or conditions which require painful or upsetting interventions to diagnose or treat. Procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) refers to the pharmacologic technique of managing the child’s pain and anxiety. The appropriate management of pain and anxiety in the EC is a significant facet of emergency care for all patients, especially in paediatric patients.1 This is achieved partly by the administration of sedative, dissociative, or analgesic drugs which alter awareness, completely sedate the patient, reduce or eliminate pain.2,3,4 PSA is an essential component of Emergency Medicine practice and is a core skill acquired in Emergency Medicine training programs. There is good evidence that proactively addressing pain and anxiety may improve quality of care and patient satisfaction by facilitating interventional procedures and minimizing patient suffering.5 DA - 2012 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2012 T1 - Paediatric procedural sedation current practice and challenges in Cape Town TI - Paediatric procedural sedation current practice and challenges in Cape Town UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/2857 ER - en_ZA


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