I write what we like: A textual analysis of Fallist microblogging

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Ndlovu, Musawenkosi
dc.contributor.author Chen, Jon Adam
dc.date.accessioned 2018-08-31T12:23:09Z
dc.date.available 2018-08-31T12:23:09Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Chen, J. 2017. I write what we like: A textual analysis of Fallist microblogging. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/28358
dc.description.abstract Fallists belong to a constellation of radical student activist movements that pledge to disturb and reimagine South African society. Rather than restricting themselves to coordinated forms of collective action, Fallists’ advance their “revolution-as-becoming” within a context of everyday resistance (Haynes & Prakash, 1991; Molefe, 2015). In this dissertation, I propose that Fallists form an “emerging networked counterpublic” made up of individual activists that enact everyday forms of resistance on Twitter (Jackson & Foucault Welles, 2016:399). This dissertation explores the use of Twitter by a microblogger who has emerged organically as a “crowdsourced elite” among Fallists (Papacharissi & de Fatima Oliveira, 2012). I contend that this microblogger exemplifies the repertoires of communication and resistance that pervade within Fallist networks on Twitter (Jackson & Foucault Welles, 2016). The microblogger is identified through methods of observation and social network analysis (SNA). “#whitetip,” a Twitter hashtag network that exemplifies Fallist communication and resistance, informs the interpretive content analysis that follows. This analysis is conducted on the tweets that the microblogger broadcast between 1 April and 30 September 2016. Tweets are categorised according to “evaluative frames” that emerged inductively during the course of analysis. I find that “resentment,” “pride and care,” and “play” made up the vast majority of evaluative frames. The microblogger employs the platform in a manner that disturbs dominant understandings of public sphere communication: the microblogger’s tweets are evaluative rather than deliberative, and assert a marginal, embodied subjectivity (Papacharissi, 2014; Warner, 2002). en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.subject Media Theory & Practice en_ZA
dc.title I write what we like: A textual analysis of Fallist microblogging en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Theses en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Centre for Film and Media Studies en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Chen, J. A. (2017). <i>I write what we like: A textual analysis of Fallist microblogging</i>. (Theses). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Film and Media Studies. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/28358 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Chen, Jon Adam. <i>"I write what we like: A textual analysis of Fallist microblogging."</i> Theses., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Film and Media Studies, 2017. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/28358 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Chen JA. I write what we like: A textual analysis of Fallist microblogging. [Theses]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Film and Media Studies, 2017 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/28358 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Chen, Jon Adam AB - Fallists belong to a constellation of radical student activist movements that pledge to disturb and reimagine South African society. Rather than restricting themselves to coordinated forms of collective action, Fallists’ advance their “revolution-as-becoming” within a context of everyday resistance (Haynes & Prakash, 1991; Molefe, 2015). In this dissertation, I propose that Fallists form an “emerging networked counterpublic” made up of individual activists that enact everyday forms of resistance on Twitter (Jackson & Foucault Welles, 2016:399). This dissertation explores the use of Twitter by a microblogger who has emerged organically as a “crowdsourced elite” among Fallists (Papacharissi & de Fatima Oliveira, 2012). I contend that this microblogger exemplifies the repertoires of communication and resistance that pervade within Fallist networks on Twitter (Jackson & Foucault Welles, 2016). The microblogger is identified through methods of observation and social network analysis (SNA). “#whitetip,” a Twitter hashtag network that exemplifies Fallist communication and resistance, informs the interpretive content analysis that follows. This analysis is conducted on the tweets that the microblogger broadcast between 1 April and 30 September 2016. Tweets are categorised according to “evaluative frames” that emerged inductively during the course of analysis. I find that “resentment,” “pride and care,” and “play” made up the vast majority of evaluative frames. The microblogger employs the platform in a manner that disturbs dominant understandings of public sphere communication: the microblogger’s tweets are evaluative rather than deliberative, and assert a marginal, embodied subjectivity (Papacharissi, 2014; Warner, 2002). DA - 2017 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town KW - Media Theory & Practice LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2017 T1 - I write what we like: A textual analysis of Fallist microblogging TI - I write what we like: A textual analysis of Fallist microblogging UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/28358 ER - en_ZA


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