Africa, African-Americans, and the avuncular Sam

 

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dc.contributor.advisor The copyright policy of the journal allows sharing of published version after 18 months embargo period according to guidelines on Sherpa-Romeo [31 July 2018].
dc.contributor.author Adebajo, Adekeye
dc.date.accessioned 2018-07-31T07:43:13Z
dc.date.available 2018-07-31T07:43:13Z
dc.date.issued 2004
dc.identifier http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/at.2004.0023
dc.identifier.citation Adebajo, A. (2004). Africa, African Americans, and the Avuncular Sam. Africa Today, 50(3), 93-110.
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/28330
dc.description.abstract This essay investigates U.S. policy toward Africa and highlights the role that African Americans have played in influencing this policy. It is inspired by the need for an urgent dialogue between Africans and African Americans on U.S. policy toward the continent. It begins by briefly assessing the ignominious roots of Africa's relationship with America and pan-Africanist efforts to liberate Africa from alien rule. It then analyzes the destructive effects on Africa of U.S. policies during the era of the Cold War. It criticizes the pernicious effects of stereotypical and simplistic coverage of Africa in the American media, and assesses U.S. policy toward Africa under the administrations of Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. It concludes by offering some policy recommendations for a more enlightened U.S. policy toward Africa.
dc.source Africa Today
dc.source.uri http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/at/summary/v050/50.3adebajo.html
dc.title Africa, African-Americans, and the avuncular Sam
dc.date.updated 2016-01-20T10:17:28Z
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Institute for Humanities in Africa en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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