The relationship between objectively-measured attributes of the built environment and selected cardiovascular risk factors in a South African urban setting

 

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dc.contributor.author Malambo, Pasmore
dc.contributor.author De Villiers, Anniza
dc.contributor.author Lambert, Estelle V
dc.contributor.author Puoane, Thandi
dc.contributor.author Kengne, Andre P
dc.date.accessioned 2018-07-16T13:27:06Z
dc.date.available 2018-07-16T13:27:06Z
dc.date.issued 2018-07-09
dc.identifier.citation BMC Public Health. 2018 Jul 09;18(1):847
dc.identifier.uri https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-018-5772-3
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/28301
dc.description.abstract Abstract Background Evidence concerning the relationship between objectively-measured attributes of the built environment with cardio-metabolic risk in populations from lower- and middle-income countries is lacking. In this paper, we describe the association between the objectively-measured built environment with body mass index, blood pressure and physical activity in adult South Africans. Methods This cross-sectional study included 341 adults aged ≥35 years drawn from the Cape Town arm of the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) cohort study. All Cape Town PURE participants were invited to take part in the study. Actigraph GT3X accelerometer and Geographic Information Systems were used to measure physical activity and built environment attributes (community center, shopping center and taxi rank). Results In age and sex adjusted models (reference 500 m), access to community centers (1000 m) was positively related to body mass index [beta 4.70 (95%CI: 2.06 to 7.34)] and diastolic blood pressure [4.97 (0.00 to 9.95)]. Distance from a community center (1600 m) was positively related to diastolic blood pressure [6.58 (1.57 to 11.58)] and inversely with moderate-to-vigorous physical activity [− 69.30 (− 134.92 to − 3.70)]. Distance to a shopping center (1600 m) was positively related to body mass index [4.78 (1.11 to 8.45)] and shopping center (1000 m) was positively related to systolic blood pressure respectively [76.99 (0.03 to 83.95)]. Conclusion Distance to community and shopping centers were significantly associated with BMI, systolic, diastolic blood pressure and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Future research should include multiple aspects of built environment variables in order to provide for a broader understanding of their effect on cardiovascular risk profile of African populations.
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher BioMed Central
dc.source BMC Public Health
dc.source.uri https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/
dc.subject.other Built environment
dc.subject.other Walkability
dc.subject.other Physical activity
dc.subject.other Geographic information system
dc.subject.other Accelerometer
dc.subject.other Objective measurement
dc.subject.other Body mass index
dc.subject.other Blood pressure
dc.subject.other Risk factors
dc.subject.other South Africa
dc.title The relationship between objectively-measured attributes of the built environment and selected cardiovascular risk factors in a South African urban setting
dc.type Journal Article
dc.date.updated 2018-07-15T03:27:10Z
dc.rights.holder The Author(s).
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department MRC/UCT RU for Exercise and Sport Medicine en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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