Sexual violence against children in South Africa: A nationally representative cross-sectional study of prevalence and correlates

 

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dc.contributor.author Ward, Catherine L
dc.contributor.author Artz, Lillian
dc.contributor.author Leoschut, Lezanne
dc.contributor.author Kassanjee, Reshma
dc.contributor.author Burton, Patrick
dc.coverage.spatial South Africa en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2018-05-10T08:54:19Z
dc.date.available 2018-05-10T08:54:19Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Ward, C.L., Artz, L., Leoschut, L., Kassanjee, R., & Burton, P. (2018). Sexual violence against children in South Africa: A nationally representative cross-sectional study of prevalence and correlates. The Lancet Global Health, 6, e460-e468. doi: 10.1016/S2214-109X(18)30060-3 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/28034
dc.description.abstract Background We could identify no nationally representative South African studies of sexual violence against children. Methods A multistage sampling frame, stratified by province, urban/rural and race group, selected households. Within households, children aged 15-17 years were interviewed after obtaining parental consent. The final sample was 5,631 (94.6% participation rate). Findings 9.99% (95%CI 8.65-11.47) of boys and 14.61% (95%CI 12.83-16.56) of girls reported some lifetime sexual victimisation. Physical abuse, emotional abuse, neglect, family violence, and other victimisations, were all strongly associated with sexual victimisation. The following were associated with greater risk of sexual abuse (adjusted OR); school enrolment (OR 2.12; 95%CI 1.29-3.48); urban dwelling (OR 0.59; 95%CI 0.43-0.80); having a flush toilet (OR 1.43; 95%CI 1.04-1.96); having a substance-misusing parent ( OR 2.37; 95%CI 1.67-3.36); being disabled (OR 1.42; 95%CI 1.10-1.82); female but not male caregivers’ poorer knowledge of the child’s whereabouts, friends and activities (OR 1.07; 95%CI 0.75-1.53) and poorer quality of the relationship with the child (OR 1.20; 95%CI 0.55-2.60). Respondents’ own substance misuse (OR 4.72; 95%CI 3.73-5.98) and high-risk sexual behaviour (OR 3.71; 95%CI 2.99-4.61) were the behaviours most frequently associated with sexual abuse, with mental health conditions far less prevalent but nonetheless strongly associated with sexual victimisation (PTSD OR 2.81, 95%CI 1.65-4.78; depression OR 3.43, 95% CI 2.26-5.19; anxiety OR 2.48, 95%CI 1.61-3.81). Interpretation Sexual violence is widespread among both girls and boys, and is associated with serious health problems. Associated factors require multi-sectoral responses to prevent sexual violence or mitigate consequences. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.publisher The Lancet Global Health en_ZA
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en_ZA
dc.source The Lancet Global Health en_ZA
dc.source.uri https://www.journals.elsevier.com/the-lancet-global-health/
dc.subject.other violence against children
dc.subject.other sexual violence
dc.subject.other South Africa
dc.title Sexual violence against children in South Africa: A nationally representative cross-sectional study of prevalence and correlates en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Psychology en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Ward, C. L., Artz, L., Leoschut, L., Kassanjee, R., & Burton, P. (2018). Sexual violence against children in South Africa: A nationally representative cross-sectional study of prevalence and correlates. <i>The Lancet Global Health</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/28034 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Ward, Catherine L, Lillian Artz, Lezanne Leoschut, Reshma Kassanjee, and Patrick Burton "Sexual violence against children in South Africa: A nationally representative cross-sectional study of prevalence and correlates." <i>The Lancet Global Health</i> (2018) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/28034 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Ward CL, Artz L, Leoschut L, Kassanjee R, Burton P. Sexual violence against children in South Africa: A nationally representative cross-sectional study of prevalence and correlates. The Lancet Global Health. 2018; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/28034. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Ward, Catherine L AU - Artz, Lillian AU - Leoschut, Lezanne AU - Kassanjee, Reshma AU - Burton, Patrick AB - Background We could identify no nationally representative South African studies of sexual violence against children. Methods A multistage sampling frame, stratified by province, urban/rural and race group, selected households. Within households, children aged 15-17 years were interviewed after obtaining parental consent. The final sample was 5,631 (94.6% participation rate). Findings 9.99% (95%CI 8.65-11.47) of boys and 14.61% (95%CI 12.83-16.56) of girls reported some lifetime sexual victimisation. Physical abuse, emotional abuse, neglect, family violence, and other victimisations, were all strongly associated with sexual victimisation. The following were associated with greater risk of sexual abuse (adjusted OR); school enrolment (OR 2.12; 95%CI 1.29-3.48); urban dwelling (OR 0.59; 95%CI 0.43-0.80); having a flush toilet (OR 1.43; 95%CI 1.04-1.96); having a substance-misusing parent ( OR 2.37; 95%CI 1.67-3.36); being disabled (OR 1.42; 95%CI 1.10-1.82); female but not male caregivers’ poorer knowledge of the child’s whereabouts, friends and activities (OR 1.07; 95%CI 0.75-1.53) and poorer quality of the relationship with the child (OR 1.20; 95%CI 0.55-2.60). Respondents’ own substance misuse (OR 4.72; 95%CI 3.73-5.98) and high-risk sexual behaviour (OR 3.71; 95%CI 2.99-4.61) were the behaviours most frequently associated with sexual abuse, with mental health conditions far less prevalent but nonetheless strongly associated with sexual victimisation (PTSD OR 2.81, 95%CI 1.65-4.78; depression OR 3.43, 95% CI 2.26-5.19; anxiety OR 2.48, 95%CI 1.61-3.81). Interpretation Sexual violence is widespread among both girls and boys, and is associated with serious health problems. Associated factors require multi-sectoral responses to prevent sexual violence or mitigate consequences. DA - 2018 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - The Lancet Global Health LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2018 T1 - Sexual violence against children in South Africa: A nationally representative cross-sectional study of prevalence and correlates TI - Sexual violence against children in South Africa: A nationally representative cross-sectional study of prevalence and correlates UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/28034 ER - en_ZA


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