Mapping and tracking the complexity of financial flows through non-state non-profit (faith-based) health providers in Kenya

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Olivier, Jill en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Foster, Nicola en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Kingangi, Lucy en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2018-05-07T09:13:39Z
dc.date.available 2018-05-07T09:13:39Z
dc.date.issued 2018 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Kingangi, L. 2018. Mapping and tracking the complexity of financial flows through non-state non-profit (faith-based) health providers in Kenya. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27941
dc.description.abstract In strengthening health systems, the World Health Report 2000 indicates that health system improvement strategies must also cover private (for-profit and non-profit) health care provision and financing if progress towards Universal Health Coverage is to be achieved. Yet very little is known about the financing of non-profit providers in Africa - especially not faith-based health providers, who have often historically remained elusive in terms of financial transparency. This thesis reports on a multiple case study conducted with two non-profit faith-based health providers in Kenya, namely the Africa Inland Church Kijabe Hospital; and Nyumbani-Children of God Relief Institute in Nairobi (Nyumbani) - and situates these within the broader context of health systems financing and public-private partnership in Kenya. Data was collected from multiples sources including: secondary literature; secondary analysis of existing data (such as the Kenya Health Information System); financial data on projects and annual reports; routine facility and service data; previous research on both organizations; archival data; and supplemented by 6 in-depth interviews with key stakeholders. The study reveals a highly complex funding environment for non-profit (and faith-based) health providers in Kenya, which is a result of historic health system configurations, and current funding policy and focus (such as the influx of HIV-related funding). The HIV program in AIC Kijabe Hospital is solely funded by USAID; while Nyumbani is also funded by USAID (70%), but has other private sources. In both cases, funding from various sources is structured differently with varied financial flows and requirements. Faith-based health providers in Kenya are highly dependent on complex donor-funding arrangements, and lack financial resilience as a result. Donors need to better understand the nuance of engagement with such providers. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Public Policy en_ZA
dc.subject.other Health Systems en_ZA
dc.subject.other Health Economics en_ZA
dc.title Mapping and tracking the complexity of financial flows through non-state non-profit (faith-based) health providers in Kenya en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Health Policy and Systems Division en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname MPH en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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