Substance use and self-harm: a cross-sectional study of the prevalence, correlates and patterns of medical service utilisation among patients admitted to a South African hospital

 

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dc.contributor.author Breet, Elsie
dc.contributor.author Bantjes, Jason
dc.contributor.author Lewis, Ian
dc.date.accessioned 2018-05-04T08:17:03Z
dc.date.available 2018-05-04T08:17:03Z
dc.date.issued 2018-03-06
dc.identifier.citation Breet, E., Bantjes, J., & Lewis, I. (2018). Substance use and self-harm: a cross-sectional study of the prevalence, correlates and patterns of medical service utilisation among patients admitted to a South African hospital. BMC health services research, 18(1), 157.
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-018-2963-7
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27929
dc.description.abstract Abstract Background Substance use is a potentially modifiable risk factor for suicidal behaviour. Little is known about the epidemiology of substance use among self-harm patients in South Africa. This study set out to collect epidemiological data about the prevalence, correlates, and patterns of medical service utilisation among self-harm patients who used substances at the time of self-injury. Methods Data from 238 consecutive self-harm patients treated at an urban hospital in South Africa were analysed using bivariate and multivariate statistics. Results Approximately 20% of patients reported substance use at the time of self-harm. When compared to other self-harm patients, higher rates of patients who had used substances: had depressed levels of consciousness on admission; utilised more medical resources and required longer hospital admissions; cited relationship difficulties and financial concerns as reasons for their self-harm; reported a previous episode of self-harm; and intended to die as a result of their injuries. Although the observed differences were not statistically significant (p > 0.05), the proportional differences were congruent with international literature. Conclusion Acute use of substances among self-harm patients warrants more focused research and clinical attention particularly in the context of reducing utilisation of scarce medical resources.
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher BioMed Central
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.source BMC Health Services Research
dc.source.uri https://bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com/
dc.subject.other Substance use
dc.subject.other Suicidal behaviour
dc.subject.other Self-harm
dc.subject.other Medical service utilisation
dc.subject.other Acute use of substances
dc.title Substance use and self-harm: a cross-sectional study of the prevalence, correlates and patterns of medical service utilisation among patients admitted to a South African hospital
dc.type Journal Article
dc.date.updated 2018-04-09T15:11:32Z
dc.rights.holder The Author(s).
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Breet, E., Bantjes, J., & Lewis, I. (2018). Substance use and self-harm: a cross-sectional study of the prevalence, correlates and patterns of medical service utilisation among patients admitted to a South African hospital. <i>BMC Health Services Research</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27929 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Breet, Elsie, Jason Bantjes, and Ian Lewis "Substance use and self-harm: a cross-sectional study of the prevalence, correlates and patterns of medical service utilisation among patients admitted to a South African hospital." <i>BMC Health Services Research</i> (2018) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27929 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Breet E, Bantjes J, Lewis I. Substance use and self-harm: a cross-sectional study of the prevalence, correlates and patterns of medical service utilisation among patients admitted to a South African hospital. BMC Health Services Research. 2018; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27929. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Breet, Elsie AU - Bantjes, Jason AU - Lewis, Ian AB - Abstract Background Substance use is a potentially modifiable risk factor for suicidal behaviour. Little is known about the epidemiology of substance use among self-harm patients in South Africa. This study set out to collect epidemiological data about the prevalence, correlates, and patterns of medical service utilisation among self-harm patients who used substances at the time of self-injury. Methods Data from 238 consecutive self-harm patients treated at an urban hospital in South Africa were analysed using bivariate and multivariate statistics. Results Approximately 20% of patients reported substance use at the time of self-harm. When compared to other self-harm patients, higher rates of patients who had used substances: had depressed levels of consciousness on admission; utilised more medical resources and required longer hospital admissions; cited relationship difficulties and financial concerns as reasons for their self-harm; reported a previous episode of self-harm; and intended to die as a result of their injuries. Although the observed differences were not statistically significant (p > 0.05), the proportional differences were congruent with international literature. Conclusion Acute use of substances among self-harm patients warrants more focused research and clinical attention particularly in the context of reducing utilisation of scarce medical resources. DA - 2018-03-06 DB - OpenUCT DO - 10.1186/s12913-018-2963-7 DP - University of Cape Town J1 - BMC Health Services Research LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2018 T1 - Substance use and self-harm: a cross-sectional study of the prevalence, correlates and patterns of medical service utilisation among patients admitted to a South African hospital TI - Substance use and self-harm: a cross-sectional study of the prevalence, correlates and patterns of medical service utilisation among patients admitted to a South African hospital UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27929 ER - en_ZA


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