An analysis of institutional structures, organisational culture and decision-making processes that affect the sustainability of buildings at the University of Cape Town

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Marquard, Andrew en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Madhlopa, Amos en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Mandalia, Jigisha en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2018-05-03T12:17:04Z
dc.date.available 2018-05-03T12:17:04Z
dc.date.issued 2018 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Mandalia, J. 2018. An analysis of institutional structures, organisational culture and decision-making processes that affect the sustainability of buildings at the University of Cape Town. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27867
dc.description.abstract Universities globally are realising the potential they have in shaping the future workforce to deal with a variety of environmental issues, such as efficient resource use and sustainable development. The University of Cape Town (UCT) has committed to a number of environmental sustainability goals and is a signatory to international sustainable campus charters. This dissertation analyses the progress of sustainability levels of buildings on campus. A case study of three recently built buildings was undertaken, the last of which attained a 4-star green rating by the Green Building Council of South Africa. A detailed analysis was conducted through semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders at the university and others, including architects and sustainability experts. This study specifically evaluates the institutional structures, organisational culture and decision-making processes that have enabled, promoted or hindered sustainable buildings at UCT. One key policy was established in 2012, which stated that all new buildings at UCT will be constructed to be 4-star rated at a minimum. The decisions leading up to this policy were analysed and they highlight the enabling mechanisms within the university. However, a number of barriers and challenges were found that hindered progress. Many challenges are not unique given the similarity of university structures and governance globally, such as lack of: resources, awareness, motivation and coordination. However, there are local and contextual challenges, especially lack of funding and competing priorities, that need to be addressed before sustainability is fully integrated into UCT. Moreover, inertia of large institutions, difficulty in shifting organisational culture, and complex and lengthy decision-making processes make change difficult at a university. Nevertheless, some strategies are explored that are likely to be effective in promoting increased sustainability levels, especially of buildings on campus. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Energy and Development Studies en_ZA
dc.title An analysis of institutional structures, organisational culture and decision-making processes that affect the sustainability of buildings at the University of Cape Town en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment
dc.publisher.department Energy Research Centre en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MPhil en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Mandalia, J. (2018). <i>An analysis of institutional structures, organisational culture and decision-making processes that affect the sustainability of buildings at the University of Cape Town</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Energy Research Centre. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27867 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Mandalia, Jigisha. <i>"An analysis of institutional structures, organisational culture and decision-making processes that affect the sustainability of buildings at the University of Cape Town."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Energy Research Centre, 2018. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27867 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Mandalia J. An analysis of institutional structures, organisational culture and decision-making processes that affect the sustainability of buildings at the University of Cape Town. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Energy Research Centre, 2018 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27867 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Mandalia, Jigisha AB - Universities globally are realising the potential they have in shaping the future workforce to deal with a variety of environmental issues, such as efficient resource use and sustainable development. The University of Cape Town (UCT) has committed to a number of environmental sustainability goals and is a signatory to international sustainable campus charters. This dissertation analyses the progress of sustainability levels of buildings on campus. A case study of three recently built buildings was undertaken, the last of which attained a 4-star green rating by the Green Building Council of South Africa. A detailed analysis was conducted through semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders at the university and others, including architects and sustainability experts. This study specifically evaluates the institutional structures, organisational culture and decision-making processes that have enabled, promoted or hindered sustainable buildings at UCT. One key policy was established in 2012, which stated that all new buildings at UCT will be constructed to be 4-star rated at a minimum. The decisions leading up to this policy were analysed and they highlight the enabling mechanisms within the university. However, a number of barriers and challenges were found that hindered progress. Many challenges are not unique given the similarity of university structures and governance globally, such as lack of: resources, awareness, motivation and coordination. However, there are local and contextual challenges, especially lack of funding and competing priorities, that need to be addressed before sustainability is fully integrated into UCT. Moreover, inertia of large institutions, difficulty in shifting organisational culture, and complex and lengthy decision-making processes make change difficult at a university. Nevertheless, some strategies are explored that are likely to be effective in promoting increased sustainability levels, especially of buildings on campus. DA - 2018 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2018 T1 - An analysis of institutional structures, organisational culture and decision-making processes that affect the sustainability of buildings at the University of Cape Town TI - An analysis of institutional structures, organisational culture and decision-making processes that affect the sustainability of buildings at the University of Cape Town UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27867 ER - en_ZA


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