A Customary Insurance Law?

 

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dc.contributor.author Hutchison, Andrew
dc.coverage.spatial South Africa; Australia. en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2018-04-09T07:06:15Z
dc.date.available 2018-04-09T07:06:15Z
dc.date.issued 2017-08-01
dc.identifier.citation Andrew Hutchison 'A Customary Insurance Law?' (2017) 29 SA Merc LJ 17. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27774
dc.description.abstract This article will explore risk spreading practices in the so-called ‘popular economy’ in South Africa. Concepts like ‘insurance’, ‘insurance law’ and ‘customary law’ will be interrogated, with the analysis falling on traditional and more modern informal responses to risk, as well as more formal responses resulting from the increased penetration of private insurance in the democratic era. This contribution aims to address concerns expressed about both informal and formal risk spreading practices, to argue towards a conclusion that a pluralistic notion of ‘insurance’ should not necessarily be sacrificed in service of corporate profit aims. Value remains in ‘customary insurance law’, and these cultural responses may provide evidence of a broader contract value system to be used in the service of developing the South African laws of contract and insurance. At very least, this value system should inform concepts like consumer insurance law and should be foregrounded in developing a notion of micro-insurance. South Africa has the potential to be a world leader in the field of customary insurance law, as the failings of a comparable system – funeral insurance in Australia – demonstrate. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.publisher Juta en_ZA
dc.source South African Mercantile Law Journal en_ZA
dc.source.uri https://juta.co.za/products/3602-south-african-mercantile-law-journal/
dc.subject.other Insurance
dc.subject.other Legal Pluralism
dc.subject.other Popular Economy
dc.subject.other Microinsurance
dc.subject.other Indigenous Persons
dc.subject.other South Africa
dc.subject.other Australia
dc.subject.other legal pluralism
dc.subject.other popular economy
dc.subject.other micro-insurance
dc.subject.other indigenous persons
dc.subject.other South Africa
dc.subject.other Australia
dc.title A Customary Insurance Law? en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Law en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Commercial Law en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Hutchison, A. (2017). A Customary Insurance Law?. <i>South African Mercantile Law Journal</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27774 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Hutchison, Andrew "A Customary Insurance Law?." <i>South African Mercantile Law Journal</i> (2017) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27774 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Hutchison A. A Customary Insurance Law?. South African Mercantile Law Journal. 2017; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27774. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Hutchison, Andrew AB - This article will explore risk spreading practices in the so-called ‘popular economy’ in South Africa. Concepts like ‘insurance’, ‘insurance law’ and ‘customary law’ will be interrogated, with the analysis falling on traditional and more modern informal responses to risk, as well as more formal responses resulting from the increased penetration of private insurance in the democratic era. This contribution aims to address concerns expressed about both informal and formal risk spreading practices, to argue towards a conclusion that a pluralistic notion of ‘insurance’ should not necessarily be sacrificed in service of corporate profit aims. Value remains in ‘customary insurance law’, and these cultural responses may provide evidence of a broader contract value system to be used in the service of developing the South African laws of contract and insurance. At very least, this value system should inform concepts like consumer insurance law and should be foregrounded in developing a notion of micro-insurance. South Africa has the potential to be a world leader in the field of customary insurance law, as the failings of a comparable system – funeral insurance in Australia – demonstrate. DA - 2017-08-01 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - South African Mercantile Law Journal LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2017 T1 - A Customary Insurance Law? TI - A Customary Insurance Law? UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27774 ER - en_ZA


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