Anaerobic digestion of Spirulina sp. and Scenedesmus sp.: a comparison and investigation of the impact of mechanical pre-treatment

 

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dc.contributor.author Inglesby, A E
dc.contributor.author Griffiths, M J
dc.contributor.author Harrison, S T L
dc.contributor.author Van Hille, R P
dc.date.accessioned 2018-03-01T09:20:03Z
dc.date.available 2016-05
dc.date.available 2018-03-01T09:20:03Z
dc.date.issued 2015-05
dc.identifier.citation Inglesby, A.E., Griffiths, M.J., Harrison, S.T.L. & van Hille, R.P. 2015, Anaerobic digestion of Spirulina sp. and Scenedesmus sp.: a comparison and investigation of the impact of mechanical pre-treatment, Journal of Applied Phycology, vol. 27, no. 5, pp. 1891-1900 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27611
dc.description.abstract AAnaerobic digestion (AD) is a unit process that integrates beneficially and sustainably into many bioprocesses. This study assesses and compares the production of methane from the biomass of the microalga Scenedesmus sp. and the cyanobacterium Spirulina sp. in batch anaerobic digesters. Anaerobic digestion of whole cell Spirulina resulted in a substantially higher methane productivity (0.18 L CH4 Lreactor −1 day−1) and methane yield (0.113 L CH4 g−1 volatile solids (VS)) compared to the digestion of whole cell Scenedesmus (0.12 L CH4 Lreactor −1 day−1 and 0.054 L CH4 g VS−1). Spirulina, possibly due to a combination of osmotic shock, the filamentous nature of the cells and lower mechanical strength of the non-cellulosic cell wall, was more readily degraded by hydrolytic and acidogenic microorganisms, resulting in the generation of a greater amount of acetic acid. This in turn provided greater substrate for methanogens and hence higher methane yields. In addition, Spirulina cells could be disrupted mechanically more quickly (1 h) than Scenedesmus cells (4 h) in a bead mill. Mechanical pre-treatment improved the final methane yields (L CH4 g VS−1) obtained from digestion of both substrates; however, the improvement was greater for Scenedesmus. Mechanical pre-treatment resulted in a 47 % increase in methane production for Spirulina compared to 76 % increase for Scenedesmus fed digesters. The more substantial increase observed for Scenedesmus was due to the relatively inefficient digestion of the whole, unruptured cells. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Springer en_ZA
dc.source Journal of Applied Phycology en_ZA
dc.source.uri https://link.springer.com/journal/10811
dc.source.uri https://link.springer.com/journal/10811
dc.subject.other Anaerobic digestion
dc.subject.other Biogas
dc.subject.other Methane
dc.subject.other Scenedesmus
dc.subject.other Spirulina
dc.subject.other Algae
dc.title Anaerobic digestion of Spirulina sp. and Scenedesmus sp.: a comparison and investigation of the impact of mechanical pre-treatment en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment
dc.publisher.department Centre for Bioprocess Engineering Research
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Inglesby, A. E., Griffiths, M. J., Harrison, S. T. L., & Van Hille, R. P. (2015). Anaerobic digestion of Spirulina sp. and Scenedesmus sp.: a comparison and investigation of the impact of mechanical pre-treatment. <i>Journal of Applied Phycology</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27611 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Inglesby, A E, M J Griffiths, S T L Harrison, and R P Van Hille "Anaerobic digestion of Spirulina sp. and Scenedesmus sp.: a comparison and investigation of the impact of mechanical pre-treatment." <i>Journal of Applied Phycology</i> (2015) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27611 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Inglesby AE, Griffiths MJ, Harrison STL, Van Hille RP. Anaerobic digestion of Spirulina sp. and Scenedesmus sp.: a comparison and investigation of the impact of mechanical pre-treatment. Journal of Applied Phycology. 2015; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27611. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Inglesby, A E AU - Griffiths, M J AU - Harrison, S T L AU - Van Hille, R P AB - AAnaerobic digestion (AD) is a unit process that integrates beneficially and sustainably into many bioprocesses. This study assesses and compares the production of methane from the biomass of the microalga Scenedesmus sp. and the cyanobacterium Spirulina sp. in batch anaerobic digesters. Anaerobic digestion of whole cell Spirulina resulted in a substantially higher methane productivity (0.18 L CH4 Lreactor −1 day−1) and methane yield (0.113 L CH4 g−1 volatile solids (VS)) compared to the digestion of whole cell Scenedesmus (0.12 L CH4 Lreactor −1 day−1 and 0.054 L CH4 g VS−1). Spirulina, possibly due to a combination of osmotic shock, the filamentous nature of the cells and lower mechanical strength of the non-cellulosic cell wall, was more readily degraded by hydrolytic and acidogenic microorganisms, resulting in the generation of a greater amount of acetic acid. This in turn provided greater substrate for methanogens and hence higher methane yields. In addition, Spirulina cells could be disrupted mechanically more quickly (1 h) than Scenedesmus cells (4 h) in a bead mill. Mechanical pre-treatment improved the final methane yields (L CH4 g VS−1) obtained from digestion of both substrates; however, the improvement was greater for Scenedesmus. Mechanical pre-treatment resulted in a 47 % increase in methane production for Spirulina compared to 76 % increase for Scenedesmus fed digesters. The more substantial increase observed for Scenedesmus was due to the relatively inefficient digestion of the whole, unruptured cells. DA - 2015-05 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - Journal of Applied Phycology LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2015 T1 - Anaerobic digestion of Spirulina sp. and Scenedesmus sp.: a comparison and investigation of the impact of mechanical pre-treatment TI - Anaerobic digestion of Spirulina sp. and Scenedesmus sp.: a comparison and investigation of the impact of mechanical pre-treatment UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27611 ER - en_ZA


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