The Single Public Service: The Recentralisation of South African Local Government?

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Cameron, Robert
dc.date 2009-07-12
dc.date.accessioned 2018-02-28T14:51:21Z
dc.date.available 2018-02-28T14:51:21Z
dc.date.issued 2018-02-28
dc.identifier.citation Cameron, R. (2009). The Single Public Service: The Recentralisation of South African Local Government? Paper presented at the 21st World Conference of the International Political Science Association (IPSA). 12-16 July. Santiago: IPSA. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27603
dc.description.abstract The South African Constitution of 1996 vested local government with substantial decentralised powers. The intergovernmental framework moved from a hierarchical system towards a three-sphere system of government where the spheres are distinctive, interdependent and interrelated. The powers and functions of local government are entrenched in the Constitution. Local government has the ability to govern to govern the local government affairs of the community with limited ability of national and provincial government to intervene. However the results of this local government experiment have been mixed. A number of studies have pointed this out. Atkinson (2007) points out that local government is characterised by poor service delivery, poor responsiveness of municipalities to citizens’ grievances, a culture of self-enrichment amongst councillors and staff along with poor support from higher tiers of government. Cameron (2007) points out that that while there are pockets of excellence, local government is characterised by lack of capacity, clientelism and patronage. This has also been acknowledged by the government. A Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) report (2006A) stated that local government was characterised by ineffective and inefficient use of resources, poor revenue collection and poor operation and maintenance of existing infrastructure. The state is gradually beginning to recentralise local government powers. Centralisation is seen as a way of improving service standards. A number of measures have been taken which have begun to erode local government’s autonomy. This paper looks at the pending Single Public Service legislation which aims to transfer local government staff into the national and provincial public service. It is argued that this is not merely a technical Public Administration measure. It will be shown that the introduction of this legislation will lead to local government employees’ accountability being directed upwards and the erosion of local democracy. Furthermore, while local government has problems of capacity and corruption, its problems are no worse than the other spheres of government. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.publisher University of Cape Town en_ZA
dc.relation.ispartofseries 21st World Conference of the International Political Science Association (IPSA) en_ZA
dc.title The Single Public Service: The Recentralisation of South African Local Government? en_ZA
dc.type Conference Paper en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Conference paper en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Political Studies en_ZA
dc.publisher.location Santiago en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record