Medication in the elderly : an outpatient survey

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Meiring, Peter en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Davis, Christopher Karl en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2018-02-01T13:30:59Z
dc.date.available 2018-02-01T13:30:59Z
dc.date.issued 1987 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Davis, C. 1987. Medication in the elderly : an outpatient survey. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27204
dc.description.abstract The aging process is associated with disease states that may be painful, disabling and life-threatening. Elderly patients frequently have more than one disorder and appropriate pharmacotherapy may result in polypharmacy (treatment with multiple drugs). This situation, combined with age-related alterations in the handling of and sensitivity to drugs, predisposes older patients to adverse drug reactions (ADR's). This study was undertaken to assess the actual risks and potential benefits of long-term polypharmacy in the management of elderly hospital out-patients. A particular aim was to get some indication of whether or not polypharmacy was justifiable in the study population. Accordingly, the medical records of 132 ambulatory patients, 70 years of age and over, who had been attending the general out-patient department of a large teaching hospital for a period of twelve months or longer, were retrospectively examined. The patient's age, diagnoses, prescribed medication, ADR's and clinical therapeutic benefit were assessed, recorded and analyzed. The average patient age in the sample studied was 77,6 years. 71% of the sample were females. 419 disorders were identified, giving an average of 3,17 per patient. 603 drugs were prescribed in total, giving an average of 4, 57 per patient. There was no statistically significant association between increasing age and the number of diagnoses per patient or the number of drugs prescribed. Medication was felt to be therapeutically effective in 63% of the patients, whilst an ADR was noted in 14% of the sample. There was no statistically significant difference in the age, number of diseases or number of drugs prescribed between the total group, the ADR group and the non-ADR group. These parameters were therefore not useful in identifying those patients more likely to experience an ADR. The apparent effectiveness of the medication prescribed and the relatively low incidence of ADR' s in the group studied suggests that appropriate and judicious multiple drug therapy can benefit many elderly ambulatory patients and therefore polypharmacy could be regarded as permissible in this context. Apart from these observations, this dissertation also includes recommendations on ways to minimize the incidence of ADRs in the elderly, and areas for ongoing research in this field are identified. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Geriatric Medicine en_ZA
dc.subject.other Geriatric pharmacology en_ZA
dc.title Medication in the elderly : an outpatient survey en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Division of Geriatric Medicine en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MMed en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Davis, C. K. (1987). <i>Medication in the elderly : an outpatient survey</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Division of Geriatric Medicine. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27204 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Davis, Christopher Karl. <i>"Medication in the elderly : an outpatient survey."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Division of Geriatric Medicine, 1987. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27204 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Davis CK. Medication in the elderly : an outpatient survey. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Division of Geriatric Medicine, 1987 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27204 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Davis, Christopher Karl AB - The aging process is associated with disease states that may be painful, disabling and life-threatening. Elderly patients frequently have more than one disorder and appropriate pharmacotherapy may result in polypharmacy (treatment with multiple drugs). This situation, combined with age-related alterations in the handling of and sensitivity to drugs, predisposes older patients to adverse drug reactions (ADR's). This study was undertaken to assess the actual risks and potential benefits of long-term polypharmacy in the management of elderly hospital out-patients. A particular aim was to get some indication of whether or not polypharmacy was justifiable in the study population. Accordingly, the medical records of 132 ambulatory patients, 70 years of age and over, who had been attending the general out-patient department of a large teaching hospital for a period of twelve months or longer, were retrospectively examined. The patient's age, diagnoses, prescribed medication, ADR's and clinical therapeutic benefit were assessed, recorded and analyzed. The average patient age in the sample studied was 77,6 years. 71% of the sample were females. 419 disorders were identified, giving an average of 3,17 per patient. 603 drugs were prescribed in total, giving an average of 4, 57 per patient. There was no statistically significant association between increasing age and the number of diagnoses per patient or the number of drugs prescribed. Medication was felt to be therapeutically effective in 63% of the patients, whilst an ADR was noted in 14% of the sample. There was no statistically significant difference in the age, number of diseases or number of drugs prescribed between the total group, the ADR group and the non-ADR group. These parameters were therefore not useful in identifying those patients more likely to experience an ADR. The apparent effectiveness of the medication prescribed and the relatively low incidence of ADR' s in the group studied suggests that appropriate and judicious multiple drug therapy can benefit many elderly ambulatory patients and therefore polypharmacy could be regarded as permissible in this context. Apart from these observations, this dissertation also includes recommendations on ways to minimize the incidence of ADRs in the elderly, and areas for ongoing research in this field are identified. DA - 1987 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1987 T1 - Medication in the elderly : an outpatient survey TI - Medication in the elderly : an outpatient survey UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27204 ER - en_ZA


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