Profiling medulloblastoma and juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma brain tumours in a South African paediatric cohort

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Figaji, Anthony en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Blackburn, Jonathan M en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Nair, Omesan en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2018-01-23T12:01:32Z
dc.date.available 2018-01-23T12:01:32Z
dc.date.issued 2017 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Nair, O. 2017. Profiling medulloblastoma and juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma brain tumours in a South African paediatric cohort. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26896
dc.description.abstract Brain tumours in children are one of the most challenging diseases to treat, and so outcomes are variable and often lacking. There are currently no reliable data of presentation of disease, the spectrum of tumours treated, how these are treated, and what the outcomes are for children in South Africa, and certainly no molecular biology data. In this respect, this thesis investigated the two commonest types of childhood brain tumour, the highly malignant Medulloblastoma (MB) and the generally less aggressive Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytoma (JPA) with relation to their molecular biology and their clinical correlates to begin to address this gap and build capacity for further molecular-based studies in an African context. The study design in this thesis takes a systematic approach and is structured into MB and JPA biochemical characterisation followed by 4 studies of their respective proteomic profiles. The study design involved creating appropriate patient cohorts and determining sample characteristics for interpretation of results. The statistical power achieved in this thesis showed a minimum of 2-fold difference for a power greater than 0.8 in each case. Proteomic clustering was used to validate or delineate any discrepancies in subtype assignments for MB. Molecular profiles together with proteomic data of MB and JPA cases in this thesis provide evidence for some novel molecular pathways, proteins and peptides associated with pathogenesis. This work therefore provides extensive data that is hypothesis generating for further studies that could build upon molecular understanding in a South African and larger African context. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Neurosurgery en_ZA
dc.title Profiling medulloblastoma and juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma brain tumours in a South African paediatric cohort en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Division of Neurosurgery en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Nair, O. (2017). <i>Profiling medulloblastoma and juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma brain tumours in a South African paediatric cohort</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Division of Neurosurgery. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26896 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Nair, Omesan. <i>"Profiling medulloblastoma and juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma brain tumours in a South African paediatric cohort."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Division of Neurosurgery, 2017. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26896 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Nair O. Profiling medulloblastoma and juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma brain tumours in a South African paediatric cohort. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Division of Neurosurgery, 2017 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26896 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Nair, Omesan AB - Brain tumours in children are one of the most challenging diseases to treat, and so outcomes are variable and often lacking. There are currently no reliable data of presentation of disease, the spectrum of tumours treated, how these are treated, and what the outcomes are for children in South Africa, and certainly no molecular biology data. In this respect, this thesis investigated the two commonest types of childhood brain tumour, the highly malignant Medulloblastoma (MB) and the generally less aggressive Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytoma (JPA) with relation to their molecular biology and their clinical correlates to begin to address this gap and build capacity for further molecular-based studies in an African context. The study design in this thesis takes a systematic approach and is structured into MB and JPA biochemical characterisation followed by 4 studies of their respective proteomic profiles. The study design involved creating appropriate patient cohorts and determining sample characteristics for interpretation of results. The statistical power achieved in this thesis showed a minimum of 2-fold difference for a power greater than 0.8 in each case. Proteomic clustering was used to validate or delineate any discrepancies in subtype assignments for MB. Molecular profiles together with proteomic data of MB and JPA cases in this thesis provide evidence for some novel molecular pathways, proteins and peptides associated with pathogenesis. This work therefore provides extensive data that is hypothesis generating for further studies that could build upon molecular understanding in a South African and larger African context. DA - 2017 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2017 T1 - Profiling medulloblastoma and juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma brain tumours in a South African paediatric cohort TI - Profiling medulloblastoma and juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma brain tumours in a South African paediatric cohort UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26896 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record