Government policy interventions to reduce human antimicrobial use: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis

 

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dc.contributor.author Rogers Van Katwyk, Susan
dc.contributor.author Grimshaw, Jeremy M
dc.contributor.author Mendelson, Marc
dc.contributor.author Taljaard, Monica
dc.contributor.author Hoffman, Steven J
dc.date.accessioned 2018-01-09T07:08:45Z
dc.date.available 2018-01-09T07:08:45Z
dc.date.issued 2017-12-13
dc.identifier.citation an Katwyk, S. R., Grimshaw, J. M., Mendelson, M., Taljaard, M., & Hoffman, S. J. (2017). Government policy interventions to reduce human antimicrobial use: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis. Systematic reviews, 6(1), 256.
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13643-017-0640-2
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26747
dc.description.abstract Background: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a recognized threat to global public health. Increasing AMR and a dry pipeline of novel antimicrobial drugs have put AMR in the international spotlight. One strategy to combat AMR is to reduce antimicrobial drug consumption. Governments around the world have been experimenting with different policy interventions, such as regulating where antimicrobials can be sold, restricting the use of last-resort antimicrobials, funding AMR stewardship programs, and launching public awareness campaigns. To inform future action, governments should have access to synthesized data on the effectiveness of large-scale AMR interventions. This planned systematic review will (1) identify and describe previously evaluated government policy interventions to reduce human antimicrobial use and (2) estimate the effectiveness of these different strategies. Methods: An electronic search strategy has been developed in consultation with two research librarians. Seven databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, CENTRAL, PAIS Index, Web of Science, and PubMed excluding MEDLINE) will be searched, and additional studies will be identified using several gray literature search strategies. To be included, a study must (1) clearly describe the government policy and (2) use a rigorous design to quantitatively measure the impact of the policy on human antibiotic use. The intervention of interest is any policy intervention enacted by a government or government agency in any country to change human antimicrobial use. Two independent reviewers will screen for eligibility using criteria defined a priori. Data will be extracted with Covidence software using a customized extraction form. If sufficient data exists, a meta-analysis by intervention type will be conducted as part of the effectiveness review. However, if there are too few studies or if the interventions are too heterogeneous, data will be tabulated and a narrative synthesis strategy will be used. Discussion: This evidence synthesis is intended for use by policymakers, public health practitioners, and researchers to inform future government policies aiming to address antimicrobial resistance. This review will also identify gaps in the evidence about the effectiveness of different policy interventions to inform future research priorities. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42017067514.
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher BioMed Central
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.source Systematic Reviews
dc.source.uri https://systematicreviewsjournal.biomedcentral.com/
dc.subject.other AMR
dc.subject.other Antimicrobial resistance
dc.subject.other Policy
dc.subject.other Government
dc.subject.other Systematic review
dc.subject.other Protocol
dc.title Government policy interventions to reduce human antimicrobial use: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis
dc.type Journal Article
dc.date.updated 2017-12-17T04:53:13Z
dc.rights.holder The Author(s).
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Division of Infectious Disease and HIV Med en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Rogers Van Katwyk, S., Grimshaw, J. M., Mendelson, M., Taljaard, M., & Hoffman, S. J. (2017). Government policy interventions to reduce human antimicrobial use: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis. <i>Systematic Reviews</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26747 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Rogers Van Katwyk, Susan, Jeremy M Grimshaw, Marc Mendelson, Monica Taljaard, and Steven J Hoffman "Government policy interventions to reduce human antimicrobial use: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis." <i>Systematic Reviews</i> (2017) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26747 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Rogers Van Katwyk S, Grimshaw JM, Mendelson M, Taljaard M, Hoffman SJ. Government policy interventions to reduce human antimicrobial use: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis. Systematic Reviews. 2017; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26747. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Rogers Van Katwyk, Susan AU - Grimshaw, Jeremy M AU - Mendelson, Marc AU - Taljaard, Monica AU - Hoffman, Steven J AB - Background: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a recognized threat to global public health. Increasing AMR and a dry pipeline of novel antimicrobial drugs have put AMR in the international spotlight. One strategy to combat AMR is to reduce antimicrobial drug consumption. Governments around the world have been experimenting with different policy interventions, such as regulating where antimicrobials can be sold, restricting the use of last-resort antimicrobials, funding AMR stewardship programs, and launching public awareness campaigns. To inform future action, governments should have access to synthesized data on the effectiveness of large-scale AMR interventions. This planned systematic review will (1) identify and describe previously evaluated government policy interventions to reduce human antimicrobial use and (2) estimate the effectiveness of these different strategies. Methods: An electronic search strategy has been developed in consultation with two research librarians. Seven databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, CENTRAL, PAIS Index, Web of Science, and PubMed excluding MEDLINE) will be searched, and additional studies will be identified using several gray literature search strategies. To be included, a study must (1) clearly describe the government policy and (2) use a rigorous design to quantitatively measure the impact of the policy on human antibiotic use. The intervention of interest is any policy intervention enacted by a government or government agency in any country to change human antimicrobial use. Two independent reviewers will screen for eligibility using criteria defined a priori. Data will be extracted with Covidence software using a customized extraction form. If sufficient data exists, a meta-analysis by intervention type will be conducted as part of the effectiveness review. However, if there are too few studies or if the interventions are too heterogeneous, data will be tabulated and a narrative synthesis strategy will be used. Discussion: This evidence synthesis is intended for use by policymakers, public health practitioners, and researchers to inform future government policies aiming to address antimicrobial resistance. This review will also identify gaps in the evidence about the effectiveness of different policy interventions to inform future research priorities. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42017067514. DA - 2017-12-13 DB - OpenUCT DO - 10.1186/s13643-017-0640-2 DP - University of Cape Town J1 - Systematic Reviews LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2017 T1 - Government policy interventions to reduce human antimicrobial use: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis TI - Government policy interventions to reduce human antimicrobial use: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26747 ER - en_ZA


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