The association between neighbourhood-level deprivation and depression: evidence from the south african national income dynamics study

 

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dc.contributor.author Dowdall, Nicholas
dc.contributor.author Ward, Catherine L
dc.contributor.author Lund, Crick
dc.date.accessioned 2018-01-08T14:02:44Z
dc.date.available 2018-01-08T14:02:44Z
dc.date.issued 2017-12-11
dc.identifier.citation Dowdall, N., Ward, C. L., & Lund, C. (2017). The association between neighbourhood-level deprivation and depression: evidence from the south african national income dynamics study. BMC psychiatry, 17(1), 395.
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12888-017-1561-2
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26746
dc.description.abstract Background: Depression contributes substantially to the burden of disease in South Africa. Little is known about how neighbourhoods affect the mental health of the people living in them. Methods: Using nationally representative data (N=11,955) from the South African National Income Dynamics Study and the South African Indices of Multiple Deprivation (SAIMD) modelled at small-area level, this study tested associations between neighbourhood-level deprivation and depression, after controlling for individual-level covariates. Results: Results showed a significant positive association between neighbourhood-level deprivation and depression using the composite SAIMD (β = 0.31 (0.15); p=0.04) as well as the separate deprivation domains. Living environment deprivation (β =0.53 (0.16); p=0.001) and employment deprivation (β = 0.38 (0.13); p=0.004), respectively, were the two most salient domains in predicting this relationship. Conclusions: Findings supported the hypothesis that there is a positive association between living in a more deprived neighbourhood and depression, even after controlling for individual-level covariates. This study suggests that alleviating structural poverty could reduce the burden of depression in South Africa.
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher BioMed Central
dc.rights https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.source BMC Psychiatry
dc.source.uri https://bmcpsychiatry.biomedcentral.com/
dc.subject.other Depression
dc.subject.other Neighbourhood
dc.subject.other Deprivation
dc.subject.other South Africa
dc.subject.other CESD-10
dc.title The association between neighbourhood-level deprivation and depression: evidence from the south african national income dynamics study
dc.type Journal Article
dc.date.updated 2017-12-17T04:53:12Z
dc.rights.holder The Author(s).
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Psychology en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Dowdall, N., Ward, C. L., & Lund, C. (2017). The association between neighbourhood-level deprivation and depression: evidence from the south african national income dynamics study. <i>BMC Psychiatry</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26746 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Dowdall, Nicholas, Catherine L Ward, and Crick Lund "The association between neighbourhood-level deprivation and depression: evidence from the south african national income dynamics study." <i>BMC Psychiatry</i> (2017) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26746 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Dowdall N, Ward CL, Lund C. The association between neighbourhood-level deprivation and depression: evidence from the south african national income dynamics study. BMC Psychiatry. 2017; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26746. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Dowdall, Nicholas AU - Ward, Catherine L AU - Lund, Crick AB - Background: Depression contributes substantially to the burden of disease in South Africa. Little is known about how neighbourhoods affect the mental health of the people living in them. Methods: Using nationally representative data (N=11,955) from the South African National Income Dynamics Study and the South African Indices of Multiple Deprivation (SAIMD) modelled at small-area level, this study tested associations between neighbourhood-level deprivation and depression, after controlling for individual-level covariates. Results: Results showed a significant positive association between neighbourhood-level deprivation and depression using the composite SAIMD (β = 0.31 (0.15); p=0.04) as well as the separate deprivation domains. Living environment deprivation (β =0.53 (0.16); p=0.001) and employment deprivation (β = 0.38 (0.13); p=0.004), respectively, were the two most salient domains in predicting this relationship. Conclusions: Findings supported the hypothesis that there is a positive association between living in a more deprived neighbourhood and depression, even after controlling for individual-level covariates. This study suggests that alleviating structural poverty could reduce the burden of depression in South Africa. DA - 2017-12-11 DB - OpenUCT DO - 10.1186/s12888-017-1561-2 DP - University of Cape Town J1 - BMC Psychiatry LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2017 T1 - The association between neighbourhood-level deprivation and depression: evidence from the south african national income dynamics study TI - The association between neighbourhood-level deprivation and depression: evidence from the south african national income dynamics study UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26746 ER - en_ZA


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