Varicella zoster virus-associated morbidity and mortality in Africa – a systematic review

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Hussey, Hannah
dc.contributor.author Abdullahi, Leila
dc.contributor.author Collins, Jamie
dc.contributor.author Muloiwa, Rudzani
dc.contributor.author Hussey, Gregory
dc.contributor.author Kagina, Benjamin
dc.date.accessioned 2017-12-15T07:22:01Z
dc.date.available 2017-12-15T07:22:01Z
dc.date.issued 2017-11-14
dc.identifier.citation Hussey, H., Abdullahi, L., Collins, J., Muloiwa, R., Hussey, G., & Kagina, B. (2017). Varicella zoster virus-associated morbidity and mortality in Africa–a systematic review. BMC infectious diseases, 17(1), 717.
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12879-017-2815-9
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26713
dc.description.abstract Background: Varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes varicella and herpes zoster. These vaccine preventable diseases are common globally. Most available data on VZV epidemiology are from industrialised temperate countries and cannot be used to guide decisions on the immunization policy against VZV in Africa. This systematic review aims to review the published data on VZV morbidity and mortality in Africa. Methods: All published studies conducted in Africa from 1974 to 2015 were eligible. Eligible studies must have reported any VZV epidemiological measure (incidence, prevalence, hospitalization rate and mortality rate). For inclusion in the review, studies must have used a defined VZV case definition, be it clinical or laboratory-based. Results: Twenty articles from 13 African countries were included in the review. Most included studies were crosssectional, conducted on hospitalized patients, and half of the studies used varying serological methods for diagnosis. VZV seroprevalence was very high among adults. Limited data on VZV seroprevalence in children showed very low seropositivity to anti-VZV antibodies. Co-morbidity with VZV was common. Conclusion: There is lack of quality data that could be used to develop VZV control programmes, including vaccination, in Africa. Trial registration: PROSPERO 2015: CRD42015026144.
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher BioMed Central
dc.source BMC Infectious Diseases
dc.source.uri https://bmcinfectdis.biomedcentral.com/
dc.subject.other Varicella
dc.subject.other Zoster
dc.subject.other Shingles
dc.subject.other Chickenpox
dc.subject.other Africa
dc.subject.other Epidemiology
dc.title Varicella zoster virus-associated morbidity and mortality in Africa – a systematic review
dc.type Journal Article
dc.date.updated 2017-11-19T04:26:29Z
dc.rights.holder The Author(s).
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Division of Medical Microbiology en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record