The effect of muscle glycogen status on control of substrate metabolism during exercise

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Noakes, Timothy D en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Dennis, Steve en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Weltan, Sandra Mary en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2017-12-12T10:55:58Z
dc.date.available 2017-12-12T10:55:58Z
dc.date.issued 1998 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Weltan, S. 1998. The effect of muscle glycogen status on control of substrate metabolism during exercise. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26559
dc.description.abstract Glycogen depletion has frequently been shown to result in a decrease in respiratory exchange ratio (RER). However, the metabolic response to glycogen depletion has generally been studied in overnight fasted subjects or in subjects who were already fatigued, or hypoglycaemic, or both, raising the question of whether the differences seen were due to general "carbohydrate deficiency" or due specifically to muscle or liver glycogen depletion. If euglycaemia and especially hyperglycaemia is maintained, the " carbohydrate deficiency" is overcome. In addition, because insulin stimulates muscle glucose uptake and not liver glucose uptake during euglycaemia (except at very high concentrations), insulin infusion would differentiate between liver and muscle glycogen depletion, since if the decrease in RER previously observed is abolished with insulin infusion while euglycaemia is maintained, this would indicate that the decrease is specifically due to muscle glycogen depletion. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the metabolic effect of glycogen content while an adequate amount or an excess of carbohydrate was provided in the form of an intravenous glucose infusion and when plasma insulin concentrations are raised. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Medical Physiology en_ZA
dc.subject.other Exercise Science en_ZA
dc.title The effect of muscle glycogen status on control of substrate metabolism during exercise en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department MRC/UCT RU for Exercise and Sport Medicine en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Weltan, S. M. (1998). <i>The effect of muscle glycogen status on control of substrate metabolism during exercise</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,MRC/UCT RU for Exercise and Sport Medicine. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26559 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Weltan, Sandra Mary. <i>"The effect of muscle glycogen status on control of substrate metabolism during exercise."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,MRC/UCT RU for Exercise and Sport Medicine, 1998. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26559 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Weltan SM. The effect of muscle glycogen status on control of substrate metabolism during exercise. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,MRC/UCT RU for Exercise and Sport Medicine, 1998 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26559 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Weltan, Sandra Mary AB - Glycogen depletion has frequently been shown to result in a decrease in respiratory exchange ratio (RER). However, the metabolic response to glycogen depletion has generally been studied in overnight fasted subjects or in subjects who were already fatigued, or hypoglycaemic, or both, raising the question of whether the differences seen were due to general "carbohydrate deficiency" or due specifically to muscle or liver glycogen depletion. If euglycaemia and especially hyperglycaemia is maintained, the " carbohydrate deficiency" is overcome. In addition, because insulin stimulates muscle glucose uptake and not liver glucose uptake during euglycaemia (except at very high concentrations), insulin infusion would differentiate between liver and muscle glycogen depletion, since if the decrease in RER previously observed is abolished with insulin infusion while euglycaemia is maintained, this would indicate that the decrease is specifically due to muscle glycogen depletion. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the metabolic effect of glycogen content while an adequate amount or an excess of carbohydrate was provided in the form of an intravenous glucose infusion and when plasma insulin concentrations are raised. DA - 1998 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1998 T1 - The effect of muscle glycogen status on control of substrate metabolism during exercise TI - The effect of muscle glycogen status on control of substrate metabolism during exercise UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26559 ER - en_ZA


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