The test meal and exocrine pancreatic function

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Bank, S en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Brom, Bernard en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2017-12-11T10:15:08Z
dc.date.available 2017-12-11T10:15:08Z
dc.date.issued 1969 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Brom, B. 1969. The test meal and exocrine pancreatic function. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26522
dc.description.abstract The pancreas is a very inaccessible organ situated in the retroperitoneal space. Study of its physiology and function was first confined to animals, where it was possible to construct a pancreatic fistula and thus collect pure pancreatic juice. In addition, pancreatic tissue from animals was also obtainable relatively easily. Early attempts to study the pancreas in man was restricted to patients with pancreatic fistulae, usually the result of surgical procedures. These investigations were on the whole unsatisfactory as the conditions of the experiment were not truly physiological and the juice soon became contaminated and infected. Another method employed later used the intraduodenal tube to collect duodenal contents. The aspirate consisted of a mixture of gastric acid and contents, duodenal juice, bile and succus entericus. Various meals were used to stimulate the pancreatic secretion. Other authors have emphasized the importance of preventing contamination of duodenal contents with gastric juice, and by inserting a second tube or double lumen tube to aspirate the acid from the stomach this was attained. Meal stimulation was now no longer possible so that various drugs and later the two hormones, secretin and pancreozymin, were used to stimulate pancreatic secretion. These two hormones very soon completely replaced any other method of pancreatic simulation. The intravenous injection or infusion of secretin and/or pancreozymin is, however, not a physiological procedure. The initial enthusiasm aroused by this method was tempered due to the varied results obtained by different workers. More recently, Lund has used the test meal to stimulate pancreatic secretion. This technique has been replicated by numerous authors, with promising results reported by all. These reports are characterized by the varied nature of the test meal used, the different position of the intraduodenal tube, the type of suction employed, the period of collection, the length of the test and the type of enzymes estimated. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the physiological responses to the test meal, to define its value in the investigation of pancreatic function and to try and standardise the procedure to obtain optimal pancreatic stimulation. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Pancreatic function en_ZA
dc.title The test meal and exocrine pancreatic function en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Division of Human Nutrition en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname MD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Brom, B. (1969). <i>The test meal and exocrine pancreatic function</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Division of Human Nutrition. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26522 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Brom, Bernard. <i>"The test meal and exocrine pancreatic function."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Division of Human Nutrition, 1969. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26522 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Brom B. The test meal and exocrine pancreatic function. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Division of Human Nutrition, 1969 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26522 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Brom, Bernard AB - The pancreas is a very inaccessible organ situated in the retroperitoneal space. Study of its physiology and function was first confined to animals, where it was possible to construct a pancreatic fistula and thus collect pure pancreatic juice. In addition, pancreatic tissue from animals was also obtainable relatively easily. Early attempts to study the pancreas in man was restricted to patients with pancreatic fistulae, usually the result of surgical procedures. These investigations were on the whole unsatisfactory as the conditions of the experiment were not truly physiological and the juice soon became contaminated and infected. Another method employed later used the intraduodenal tube to collect duodenal contents. The aspirate consisted of a mixture of gastric acid and contents, duodenal juice, bile and succus entericus. Various meals were used to stimulate the pancreatic secretion. Other authors have emphasized the importance of preventing contamination of duodenal contents with gastric juice, and by inserting a second tube or double lumen tube to aspirate the acid from the stomach this was attained. Meal stimulation was now no longer possible so that various drugs and later the two hormones, secretin and pancreozymin, were used to stimulate pancreatic secretion. These two hormones very soon completely replaced any other method of pancreatic simulation. The intravenous injection or infusion of secretin and/or pancreozymin is, however, not a physiological procedure. The initial enthusiasm aroused by this method was tempered due to the varied results obtained by different workers. More recently, Lund has used the test meal to stimulate pancreatic secretion. This technique has been replicated by numerous authors, with promising results reported by all. These reports are characterized by the varied nature of the test meal used, the different position of the intraduodenal tube, the type of suction employed, the period of collection, the length of the test and the type of enzymes estimated. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the physiological responses to the test meal, to define its value in the investigation of pancreatic function and to try and standardise the procedure to obtain optimal pancreatic stimulation. DA - 1969 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1969 T1 - The test meal and exocrine pancreatic function TI - The test meal and exocrine pancreatic function UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26522 ER - en_ZA


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