Seed biology of a recently introduced species, Myoporum laetum in comparison to a successful invasive alien, Acacia cyclops, in the southwestern Cape, South Africa

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Knight, Richard Spencer en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Moll, Eugene J en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Richards, Michael Bruce en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2017-11-10T08:57:16Z
dc.date.available 2017-11-10T08:57:16Z
dc.date.issued 1988 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Richards, M. 1988. Seed biology of a recently introduced species, Myoporum laetum in comparison to a successful invasive alien, Acacia cyclops, in the southwestern Cape, South Africa. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26134
dc.description.abstract The invasive potential of Myoporum laetum, a tree recently introduced into the southwestern Cape, South Africa, was evaluated, by comparing various aspects of its seed biology with those of another bird-dispersed alien, Acacia cyclops which is a successful invader in this region. M. laetum has higher annual seed production, but lower soil-stored seed banks than A. cyclops. Both experience high seed predation, especially under parent canopies. M. laetum has a more persistant seed store and is able to germinate and establish in shade. Germination of untreated A. cyclops seeds was 23.3% and this increased to 47.4% after mild heat treatment. Untreated M. laetum seeds were completely dormant, but 3.3% germinated after acid treatment. The high seed production, bird dispersal, persistant seed banks and ability to establish in shade, suggest that M. laetum could become invasive in thickets, such as existing acacia stands. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Botany en_ZA
dc.title Seed biology of a recently introduced species, Myoporum laetum in comparison to a successful invasive alien, Acacia cyclops, in the southwestern Cape, South Africa en_ZA
dc.type Bachelor Thesis
dc.date.updated 2017-03-10T15:29:47Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Biological Sciences en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Honours
dc.type.qualificationname BSc (Hons) en_ZA
uct.type.filetype
uct.type.filetype Text
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dc.identifier.apacitation Richards, M. B. (1988). <i>Seed biology of a recently introduced species, Myoporum laetum in comparison to a successful invasive alien, Acacia cyclops, in the southwestern Cape, South Africa</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26134 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Richards, Michael Bruce. <i>"Seed biology of a recently introduced species, Myoporum laetum in comparison to a successful invasive alien, Acacia cyclops, in the southwestern Cape, South Africa."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 1988. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26134 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Richards MB. Seed biology of a recently introduced species, Myoporum laetum in comparison to a successful invasive alien, Acacia cyclops, in the southwestern Cape, South Africa. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 1988 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26134 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Richards, Michael Bruce AB - The invasive potential of Myoporum laetum, a tree recently introduced into the southwestern Cape, South Africa, was evaluated, by comparing various aspects of its seed biology with those of another bird-dispersed alien, Acacia cyclops which is a successful invader in this region. M. laetum has higher annual seed production, but lower soil-stored seed banks than A. cyclops. Both experience high seed predation, especially under parent canopies. M. laetum has a more persistant seed store and is able to germinate and establish in shade. Germination of untreated A. cyclops seeds was 23.3% and this increased to 47.4% after mild heat treatment. Untreated M. laetum seeds were completely dormant, but 3.3% germinated after acid treatment. The high seed production, bird dispersal, persistant seed banks and ability to establish in shade, suggest that M. laetum could become invasive in thickets, such as existing acacia stands. DA - 1988 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1988 T1 - Seed biology of a recently introduced species, Myoporum laetum in comparison to a successful invasive alien, Acacia cyclops, in the southwestern Cape, South Africa TI - Seed biology of a recently introduced species, Myoporum laetum in comparison to a successful invasive alien, Acacia cyclops, in the southwestern Cape, South Africa UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26134 ER - en_ZA


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