Plant traits and drought tolerance in the savanna : a Kruger National Park case study

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Bond, William J en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor February, Edmund C en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Shabane, Tirelo en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2017-11-10T06:32:55Z
dc.date.available 2017-11-10T06:32:55Z
dc.date.issued 2008 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Shabane, T. 2008. Plant traits and drought tolerance in the savanna : a Kruger National Park case study. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26120
dc.description.abstract One of the central goals of plant ecology is to understand the factors that control the local distribution of plant species and thus the composition of communities. The aim of this study is to determine plant functional traits that can be associated with drought tolerance/avoidance and to test whether wood density is a good indicator of drought tolerance. The study was carried out in Kruger National Park in the month of June. A number of plant traits including wood density, leaf thickness, leaf life span/longevity and water potential were measured along a rainfall gradient (from south to north of the park). Wood density and water potential did not show any significant differences between the wet and dry sites. Leaf thickness and percent leaf cover showed significant correlations with the rainfall gradient (p=0.00 and 0.02 respectively). Wood density may not be the single most important factor that confers fitness during drought. Tolerance in plants may come about as a result of the interplay between plant traits and site characteristics that may result in the differential response even in plants that may be deemed drought tolerant. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Botany en_ZA
dc.title Plant traits and drought tolerance in the savanna : a Kruger National Park case study en_ZA
dc.type Bachelor Thesis
dc.date.updated 2017-03-10T14:46:26Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Biological Sciences en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Honours
dc.type.qualificationname BSc (Hons) en_ZA
uct.type.filetype
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Shabane, T. (2008). <i>Plant traits and drought tolerance in the savanna : a Kruger National Park case study</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26120 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Shabane, Tirelo. <i>"Plant traits and drought tolerance in the savanna : a Kruger National Park case study."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 2008. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26120 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Shabane T. Plant traits and drought tolerance in the savanna : a Kruger National Park case study. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 2008 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26120 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Shabane, Tirelo AB - One of the central goals of plant ecology is to understand the factors that control the local distribution of plant species and thus the composition of communities. The aim of this study is to determine plant functional traits that can be associated with drought tolerance/avoidance and to test whether wood density is a good indicator of drought tolerance. The study was carried out in Kruger National Park in the month of June. A number of plant traits including wood density, leaf thickness, leaf life span/longevity and water potential were measured along a rainfall gradient (from south to north of the park). Wood density and water potential did not show any significant differences between the wet and dry sites. Leaf thickness and percent leaf cover showed significant correlations with the rainfall gradient (p=0.00 and 0.02 respectively). Wood density may not be the single most important factor that confers fitness during drought. Tolerance in plants may come about as a result of the interplay between plant traits and site characteristics that may result in the differential response even in plants that may be deemed drought tolerant. DA - 2008 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2008 T1 - Plant traits and drought tolerance in the savanna : a Kruger National Park case study TI - Plant traits and drought tolerance in the savanna : a Kruger National Park case study UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/26120 ER - en_ZA


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