A Comparison of Close-Range Photogrammetry to Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Heritage Documentation

 

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dc.contributor.author Ruther, Heinz
dc.contributor.author Smit, Julian Lloyd
dc.contributor.author Kamamba, Donatius
dc.date.accessioned 2017-11-01T06:54:28Z
dc.date.available 2017-11-01T06:54:28Z
dc.date.issued 2013
dc.identifier.citation Rüther, H., Smit, J., & Kamamba, D. (2012). A comparison of close-range photogrammetry to terrestrial laser scanning for heritage documentation. South African Journal of Geomatics, 1(2), 149-162.
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/25961
dc.description.abstract This paper describes the photogrammetric and laser scan survey of an excavated section of the Laetoli hominid track-way in Tanzania. The survey was designed to allow for comparison to a prior detailed survey of the track-way carried out in 1995, and serves as a means to compare terrestrial laser scanning with close-range photogrammetry as survey methods for heritage documentation. Each hominid footprint in the track-way was photogrammetrically recorded using a rigorous multi-image controlled configuration. In a separate process a laser scanner was used to scan the entire track-way as well as the individual footprints. The data for the comparison and track-way / footprint shape assessment were a photogrammetrically generated point cloud and a 3D model (established in 1995 and 2011), as well as a laser scan point cloud acquired in the 2011 survey. The results showed a high agreement between the laser scan and the photogrammetric data captured in 2011. These two survey processes are entirely independent of each other, the results can be accepted as entirely objective and the excellent agreement between the data can serve as quality control, confirming that the footprint point clouds were captured with an external accuracy of approximately 0.3 to 0.4mm. Standard deviations which are internal precision measures, and typically optimistic, show an individual point accuracy of 0.1 to 0.2 mm. The accuracy for the full laser scan track-way survey was in the order of 1mm.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.source South African Journal of Geomatics
dc.source.uri http://www.sajg.org.za/index.php/sajg/index
dc.title A Comparison of Close-Range Photogrammetry to Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Heritage Documentation
dc.type Journal Article
dc.date.updated 2017-10-31T07:49:10Z
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment
dc.publisher.department School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Ruther, H., Smit, J. L., & Kamamba, D. (2013). A Comparison of Close-Range Photogrammetry to Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Heritage Documentation. <i>South African Journal of Geomatics</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/25961 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Ruther, Heinz, Julian Lloyd Smit, and Donatius Kamamba "A Comparison of Close-Range Photogrammetry to Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Heritage Documentation." <i>South African Journal of Geomatics</i> (2013) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/25961 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Ruther H, Smit JL, Kamamba D. A Comparison of Close-Range Photogrammetry to Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Heritage Documentation. South African Journal of Geomatics. 2013; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/25961. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Ruther, Heinz AU - Smit, Julian Lloyd AU - Kamamba, Donatius AB - This paper describes the photogrammetric and laser scan survey of an excavated section of the Laetoli hominid track-way in Tanzania. The survey was designed to allow for comparison to a prior detailed survey of the track-way carried out in 1995, and serves as a means to compare terrestrial laser scanning with close-range photogrammetry as survey methods for heritage documentation. Each hominid footprint in the track-way was photogrammetrically recorded using a rigorous multi-image controlled configuration. In a separate process a laser scanner was used to scan the entire track-way as well as the individual footprints. The data for the comparison and track-way / footprint shape assessment were a photogrammetrically generated point cloud and a 3D model (established in 1995 and 2011), as well as a laser scan point cloud acquired in the 2011 survey. The results showed a high agreement between the laser scan and the photogrammetric data captured in 2011. These two survey processes are entirely independent of each other, the results can be accepted as entirely objective and the excellent agreement between the data can serve as quality control, confirming that the footprint point clouds were captured with an external accuracy of approximately 0.3 to 0.4mm. Standard deviations which are internal precision measures, and typically optimistic, show an individual point accuracy of 0.1 to 0.2 mm. The accuracy for the full laser scan track-way survey was in the order of 1mm. DA - 2013 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - South African Journal of Geomatics LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2013 T1 - A Comparison of Close-Range Photogrammetry to Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Heritage Documentation TI - A Comparison of Close-Range Photogrammetry to Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Heritage Documentation UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/25961 ER - en_ZA


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