Host specificity in the Rhizobium symbioses of two Aspalathus species and an invasive alien legume, Acacia saligna

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Deignan, M T en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Cowling, Richard M en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Richards, Michael Bruce en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2017-10-25T08:36:17Z
dc.date.available 2017-10-25T08:36:17Z
dc.date.issued 1988 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Richards, M. 1988. Host specificity in the Rhizobium symbioses of two Aspalathus species and an invasive alien legume, Acacia saligna. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/25788
dc.description.abstract The symbiotic specificity of Aspalathus capensis and A. carnosa in relation to their geographical distribution, was investigated by growing plants in soil and in tubes containing soil solutions plus nitrogen-free nutrient solutions. Soila were collected from three sites within their distribution and two from 90km outside. Both species formed nodules in all three soils from within their distribution and A. capensis in one from outside. A. carnosa did not survive in tube culture. The possible role of hostspecificity in the distribution of A. capensis and A. carnosa is discussed. A widespread invasive alien legume, Acacia saligna . was grown in the same soils and soil solutions. It formed nodules only in the three soils from within the distribution of Aspalathus capensis. The degree of nodulation varied between these soils. The possible importance of host-strain specificity in the invasive ability of alien legumes is discussed. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Botany en_ZA
dc.title Host specificity in the Rhizobium symbioses of two Aspalathus species and an invasive alien legume, Acacia saligna en_ZA
dc.type Bachelor Thesis
dc.date.updated 2017-03-07T10:19:49Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Biological Sciences en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Honours
dc.type.qualificationname BSc (Hons) en_ZA
uct.type.filetype
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Richards, M. B. (1988). <i>Host specificity in the Rhizobium symbioses of two Aspalathus species and an invasive alien legume, Acacia saligna</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/25788 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Richards, Michael Bruce. <i>"Host specificity in the Rhizobium symbioses of two Aspalathus species and an invasive alien legume, Acacia saligna."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 1988. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/25788 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Richards MB. Host specificity in the Rhizobium symbioses of two Aspalathus species and an invasive alien legume, Acacia saligna. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 1988 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/25788 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Richards, Michael Bruce AB - The symbiotic specificity of Aspalathus capensis and A. carnosa in relation to their geographical distribution, was investigated by growing plants in soil and in tubes containing soil solutions plus nitrogen-free nutrient solutions. Soila were collected from three sites within their distribution and two from 90km outside. Both species formed nodules in all three soils from within their distribution and A. capensis in one from outside. A. carnosa did not survive in tube culture. The possible role of hostspecificity in the distribution of A. capensis and A. carnosa is discussed. A widespread invasive alien legume, Acacia saligna . was grown in the same soils and soil solutions. It formed nodules only in the three soils from within the distribution of Aspalathus capensis. The degree of nodulation varied between these soils. The possible importance of host-strain specificity in the invasive ability of alien legumes is discussed. DA - 1988 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1988 T1 - Host specificity in the Rhizobium symbioses of two Aspalathus species and an invasive alien legume, Acacia saligna TI - Host specificity in the Rhizobium symbioses of two Aspalathus species and an invasive alien legume, Acacia saligna UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/25788 ER - en_ZA


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