The successional dynamics of Acacia nilotica (L.) savanna

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Midgley, Jeremy J en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Skowno, Andrew L en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2017-10-25T08:17:24Z
dc.date.available 2017-10-25T08:17:24Z
dc.date.issued 1996 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Skowno, A. 1996. The successional dynamics of Acacia nilotica (L.) savanna. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/25778
dc.description.abstract Analysis of aerial photographs indicates that woody plant biomass has increased in Hluhluwe Game Reserve, KwaZulu Natal, over a relatively short period. Despite their slow growth rates, Eucleas and other broadleaf species are responsible for the majority of this increase. Nine sites were chosen to examine the recruitment patterns and sizeclass distributions of Euclea divinorum and E. racemosa. Analysis of the size-class distribution data suggests that recruitment of Eucleas is slightly higher below adult A. nilotica canopies than in adjacent interspaces. The number of seedlings is significantly higher below Acacia canopies than in open spaces. Size class data indicate that the largest Euclea individuals are found in open spaces and not below A. nilotica canopies. Because Eucleas have slower growth rates than A. nilotica, the large Eucleas may well have become established before the present A. nilotica stand. The data also indicate that A. karroo is replacing A. nilotica and that broadleaf species other than Eucleas are recruiting in both open and below canopy plots. I suggest A. nilotica adults only weakly facilitate the establishment of Eucleas and other broadleaved species, and that increase in woody vegetation is due to changes in the fire regime that allow suppressed broadleaf individuals to escape and become visible. This release may explain the rapid rate of encroachment by inherently slow growing species. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Botany en_ZA
dc.title The successional dynamics of Acacia nilotica (L.) savanna en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2017-02-17T08:38:02Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Biological Sciences en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Honours en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname BSc (Hons) en_ZA
uct.type.filetype
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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