Validation of weight estimation by age and length based methods in the South African population

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Wallis, Lee A en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Geduld, Heike en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2017-10-25T08:16:13Z
dc.date.available 2017-10-25T08:16:13Z
dc.date.issued 2008 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Geduld, H. 2008. Validation of weight estimation by age and length based methods in the South African population. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/25777
dc.description.abstract Paediatric resuscitation can be a stressful event for many clinicians. It is compounded by the need to calculate accurate drug dosages and equipment sizes for many interventions. These calculations are most often based on weight, which is a difficult parameter to obtain. It is rare that one is able to weigh a child before a resuscitation. There are many different methods available for weight estimation. Most of these are formulae based on age but length based tools are often used. Most of these formulae were derived in developed world populations and have become inaccurate due to the changing weights and heights of children. The aim of this study was to evaluate 4 weight estimation methods (APLS, Luscombe and Owens, Best Guess and Broselow® Tape) to determine which are accurate for weight estimation in South African Children. These 4 formulae were also used to calculate the doses of adrenaline (0.1 m/kg of 1: 10000), Fluid bolus (20ml/kg) and First Shock defibrillation dose (2J/Kg) to determine which were clinically useful. A database of 3233 children between 1 and 12 years seen at Red Cross Hospital· Trauma Unit in Cape Town during 2002 was used. Measured weight was compared to estimated weights from all 4 methods and Intervention doses calculated from measured weight was compared to doses from weight estimation methods. APLS formula and the Broselow® Tape showed the best correlation with measured weight. Mean percent error- 6.4% for APLS for 1-10 year olds and -10% error for Broselow® tape in children <145cm length. Both the Best Guess and Luscombe and Owens formulae tended to overestimate weight (+13.4% and +17.6 % respectively). The Broselow tape was most accurate for dosages of all interventions but little difference existed between methods. The APLS and Broselow® tape are most accurate in estimating weight in the South African population, even though they have a tendency to underestimate weight. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Emergency Medicine en_ZA
dc.title Validation of weight estimation by age and length based methods in the South African population en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2017-05-26T07:14:40Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Division of Emergency Medicine en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname MMed en_ZA
uct.type.filetype
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record