An exploration of work environment adaptive mechanisms used by women living with HIV/AIDS in Gaborone-Botswana

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Buchanan, Helen en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Ramugondo, Elelwani en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Malonza, Patrice en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2017-09-23T06:21:01Z
dc.date.available 2017-09-23T06:21:01Z
dc.date.issued 2017 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Malonza, P. 2017. An exploration of work environment adaptive mechanisms used by women living with HIV/AIDS in Gaborone-Botswana. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/25331
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: Cycling has become increasingly popular as a recreational and competitive sport, and the positive health benefits of cycling are well known. However, there are negative health effects associated with cycling. Exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD) and fatigue are common in cycling populations, and require a period of recovery so as not to progress into more serious chronic injury and overtraining, and allow for improved performance through adaptation. There are many recovery methods currently available to facilitate this recovery process. However, there is little information regarding the use of these modalities, and further, the understanding of these modalities. An understanding of the specific use of recovery modalities in cycling is necessary to guide further research, and to promote safe and efficient use of recovery strategies. AIM AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to describe the use of recovery interventions in road and mountain bike (MTB) cyclists in South Africa. The specific objectives of this study were: (a) to determine the pattern of use of recovery modalities by endurance cyclists, specifically which modalities are being used, the frequency of use of each modality, and the use of each modality during training and races; (b) to determine the factors that influence road and MTB endurance cyclists' choices of recovery modalities and the rationale for use of specific recovery modalities; (c) to explore associations between the use of recovery modalities by road and MTB endurance cyclists and socio-demographic factors such as gender, age, body mass index (BMI), monthly income, level of education; and training and competition history. METHODS: This study had a descriptive, cross-sectional correlational design. Healthy adult cyclists who had been cycling for at least six months of the previous two years were included in the study. Participants who failed to provide informed consent or did not complete mandatory sections of the questionnaire were excluded. Participants were recruited by social media and word of mouth. Participants were required to complete a purpose-developed online questionnaire that included demographic and medical, training and race history, and use of recovery sections. The questionnaire was validated by a panel of topic experts. RESULTS: The study sample included 95 participants. Participants were predominantly middle- to higher-income, tertiary educated males. Participants reported using an average of 9 ± 2 recovery modalities, with protein (86%), carbohydrate (82%), sleep (75%) and passive recovery (74%) being the most commonly used. Recovery modality use was prevalent after all kinds of races (road and MTB), whether single or multiple stage. Personal experience, followed by coaches and trainers, fellow cyclists, and healthcare providers were the strongest influencers of which recovery modalities cyclists used. Participants aged 40 years or older were more likely to use ice/cold therapy, compression garments, active recovery, and carbohydrates. A BMI of 18.5-24.9 was predictive of the use of compression garments, passive recovery, and protein. Monthly income of more than R50 000 was a predictor for the use of stretching. Pre-race cycling volume of four or more training sessions per week was predictive of the use of active recovery, protein and carbohydrate. There were no predictive demographic characteristics explaining the use of anti-inflammatory medication, contrast therapy, massage, sleep, hyperbaric oxygen therapy and vitamins and minerals. Cycling history, pre-race cycling frequency and race experience were not predictive for the use of any of the listed recovery modalities. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, this study demonstrates that while there is widespread use of recovery modalities, the practice of use is inconsistent. In the case of modalities that are shown to be beneficial, correct protocols for use need to be disseminated to ensure safe and efficient practice going forward. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Occupational Therapy en_ZA
dc.title An exploration of work environment adaptive mechanisms used by women living with HIV/AIDS in Gaborone-Botswana en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Division of Occupational Therapy en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname MSc (Med) en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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