An investigation into recruitment, retention and motivation of advanced life support practitioners in South Africa

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Bhagwan, Raisuyah en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Wallis, Lee A en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Gangaram, Padarath en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2017-09-22T12:00:37Z
dc.date.available 2017-09-22T12:00:37Z
dc.date.issued 2017 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Gangaram, P. 2017. An investigation into recruitment, retention and motivation of advanced life support practitioners in South Africa. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/25289
dc.description.abstract Background: Internationally, emergency medical services (EMS) are experiencing problems with recruiting, retaining and motivating advanced life support (ALS) practitioners. The persistent shortage of ALS practitioners in South Africa (SA) poses a challenge to the effective delivery of prehospital emergency medical care. The global demand for SA trained ALS practitioners is steadily increasing. SA EMS organisations are struggling to compete for these practitioners with the international market. The SA EMS industry currently has no effective approach to decrease the loss of ALS practitioners. This research study was therefore conceptualized to investigate factors that influence ALS practitioner recruitment, retention and motivation in an effort to enhance them. Methods: This study followed a sequential, explanatory, mixed method design. The two phase study was non-experimental and descriptive in nature. The quantitative phase was comprised of ALS practitioners (n=1309) and EMS managers (n=60) completing questionnaires. The qualitative phase of the study involved data gathering through focus group (n=7) discussions with ALS practitioners and semi-structured interviews with EMS managers (n=6). Quantitative data was analysed with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS). Inferential techniques included the use of correlations and chi squared test values which were interpreted using p-values. Results: The study identified 19 recruitment, 25 retention and 16 motivation factors that influence ALS practitioners. Cumulatively, these factors revolved around the ALS practitioners' work environment, professional development and employment package. Strong recruitment factors that were identified include: ALS practitioner remuneration, skilled EMS management and organisation culture. Similarly, strong ALS practitioner retention factors that were identified include: skilled EMS management, remuneration, resources, availability of health and wellness programmes, recognition of practitioners, working conditions and safety and security. Strong ALS practitioner motivation factors included: remuneration, skilled EMS management and resources. Conclusion: More ALS practitioner training institutions are required to improve the number of these practitioners. EMS organisations must improve the work environment, employment package and professional development opportunities for ALS practitioners. Such practices will encourage ALS practitioner recruitment, retention and motivation. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Emergency Medicine en_ZA
dc.title An investigation into recruitment, retention and motivation of advanced life support practitioners in South Africa en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Division of Emergency Medicine en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Gangaram, P. (2017). <i>An investigation into recruitment, retention and motivation of advanced life support practitioners in South Africa</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Division of Emergency Medicine. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/25289 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Gangaram, Padarath. <i>"An investigation into recruitment, retention and motivation of advanced life support practitioners in South Africa."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Division of Emergency Medicine, 2017. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/25289 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Gangaram P. An investigation into recruitment, retention and motivation of advanced life support practitioners in South Africa. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Division of Emergency Medicine, 2017 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/25289 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Gangaram, Padarath AB - Background: Internationally, emergency medical services (EMS) are experiencing problems with recruiting, retaining and motivating advanced life support (ALS) practitioners. The persistent shortage of ALS practitioners in South Africa (SA) poses a challenge to the effective delivery of prehospital emergency medical care. The global demand for SA trained ALS practitioners is steadily increasing. SA EMS organisations are struggling to compete for these practitioners with the international market. The SA EMS industry currently has no effective approach to decrease the loss of ALS practitioners. This research study was therefore conceptualized to investigate factors that influence ALS practitioner recruitment, retention and motivation in an effort to enhance them. Methods: This study followed a sequential, explanatory, mixed method design. The two phase study was non-experimental and descriptive in nature. The quantitative phase was comprised of ALS practitioners (n=1309) and EMS managers (n=60) completing questionnaires. The qualitative phase of the study involved data gathering through focus group (n=7) discussions with ALS practitioners and semi-structured interviews with EMS managers (n=6). Quantitative data was analysed with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS). Inferential techniques included the use of correlations and chi squared test values which were interpreted using p-values. Results: The study identified 19 recruitment, 25 retention and 16 motivation factors that influence ALS practitioners. Cumulatively, these factors revolved around the ALS practitioners' work environment, professional development and employment package. Strong recruitment factors that were identified include: ALS practitioner remuneration, skilled EMS management and organisation culture. Similarly, strong ALS practitioner retention factors that were identified include: skilled EMS management, remuneration, resources, availability of health and wellness programmes, recognition of practitioners, working conditions and safety and security. Strong ALS practitioner motivation factors included: remuneration, skilled EMS management and resources. Conclusion: More ALS practitioner training institutions are required to improve the number of these practitioners. EMS organisations must improve the work environment, employment package and professional development opportunities for ALS practitioners. Such practices will encourage ALS practitioner recruitment, retention and motivation. DA - 2017 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2017 T1 - An investigation into recruitment, retention and motivation of advanced life support practitioners in South Africa TI - An investigation into recruitment, retention and motivation of advanced life support practitioners in South Africa UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/25289 ER - en_ZA


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