Were Malagasy Uncarina fruits dispersed by the extinct elephant bird?

 

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dc.contributor.author Midgley, J J
dc.contributor.author Illing, N
dc.date.accessioned 2017-09-04T13:55:42Z
dc.date.available 2017-09-04T13:55:42Z
dc.date.issued 2009
dc.identifier.citation Midgley, J. J., & Illing, N. (2009). Were Malagasy Uncarina fruits dispersed by the extinct elephant bird?. South African Journal of Science, 105(11-12), 467-469.
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/25032
dc.description.abstract We hypothesise that the spiny fruits of the endemic Madagascar genus Uncarina (Pedaliaceae) are trample burrs that evolved to be dispersed on the feet of the extinct elephant bird (Aepyornis). Our evidence is : i) the morphology of the fruit with its large grapple hooks is more likely to attach to a foot than to adhere to fur and ii) the presentation of mature fruits on the ground rather than in the canopy. These differences to adhesive burrs make lemurs unlikely dispersers. We argue, given the absence of other large terrestrial mammals in Madagascar, that the most likely dispersers of Uncarina fruits were the extinct large birds. If correct, our hypothesis has implications for conservation of Uncarina, the biogeography of the elephant birds and dispersal biology. For example, we predict that the demography of Uncarina will be skewed towards adult plants, and that the dispersal mutualism could possibly be rescued by domestic animals.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.source South African Journal of Science
dc.source.uri http://www.sajs.co.za/
dc.subject.other Madagascar
dc.subject.other Aepyornis
dc.subject.other Burrs
dc.subject.other Seed dispersal
dc.title Were Malagasy Uncarina fruits dispersed by the extinct elephant bird?
dc.type Journal Article
dc.date.updated 2016-01-13T09:00:00Z
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Biological Sciences en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Midgley, J. J., & Illing, N. (2009). Were Malagasy Uncarina fruits dispersed by the extinct elephant bird?. <i>South African Journal of Science</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/25032 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Midgley, J J, and N Illing "Were Malagasy Uncarina fruits dispersed by the extinct elephant bird?." <i>South African Journal of Science</i> (2009) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/25032 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Midgley JJ, Illing N. Were Malagasy Uncarina fruits dispersed by the extinct elephant bird?. South African Journal of Science. 2009; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/25032. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - AU - Midgley, J J AU - Illing, N AB - We hypothesise that the spiny fruits of the endemic Madagascar genus Uncarina (Pedaliaceae) are trample burrs that evolved to be dispersed on the feet of the extinct elephant bird (Aepyornis). Our evidence is : i) the morphology of the fruit with its large grapple hooks is more likely to attach to a foot than to adhere to fur and ii) the presentation of mature fruits on the ground rather than in the canopy. These differences to adhesive burrs make lemurs unlikely dispersers. We argue, given the absence of other large terrestrial mammals in Madagascar, that the most likely dispersers of Uncarina fruits were the extinct large birds. If correct, our hypothesis has implications for conservation of Uncarina, the biogeography of the elephant birds and dispersal biology. For example, we predict that the demography of Uncarina will be skewed towards adult plants, and that the dispersal mutualism could possibly be rescued by domestic animals. DA - 2009 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - South African Journal of Science LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2009 T1 - Were Malagasy Uncarina fruits dispersed by the extinct elephant bird? TI - Were Malagasy Uncarina fruits dispersed by the extinct elephant bird? UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/25032 ER - en_ZA


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