The out of school literacy practices and semiotic resources of two grade 4 boys who excel at creative writing

 

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dc.contributor.advisor McKinney, Carolyn en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Abdulla, Nabila en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2017-08-28T13:12:26Z
dc.date.available 2017-08-28T13:12:26Z
dc.date.issued 2017 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Abdulla, N. 2017. The out of school literacy practices and semiotic resources of two grade 4 boys who excel at creative writing. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24991
dc.description.abstract Previous socio-cultural research has shown the importance of creative writing and that children's creative writing is fuelled by their interests . It is believed that reading and writing is intimately connected and that those who can read well should be able to write well and vice versa. However, teachers have argued that those who do read tend to fill their writing with elements of popular culture, and those who read extensively aren't all capable of producing quality fictional writing either, as the skills and knowledge which they develop from reading don't necessarily translate into their writing. Through my teaching experiences I discovered a general negativity amongst South African teachers towards creative writing. Furthermore, the South African curriculum seems to provide little support for the advancement in creative writing as well. As a result I became interested in two of my learners, both boys, who excel at creative writing. Their narratives are rich in detail, contain exciting plots, and are generally entertaining and engaging reads. Both boys are avid readers as well. I questioned what contributed to their ability to produce excellent narratives as reading could not be the only factor. As I was aware of their in-school practices I decided it would be beneficial to examine their out of school literacy practices and semiotic resources and whether they affect or contribute towards their creative writing. I developed a case study based on home visits, interviews and collecting artefacts. I discovered that family social practices underpin many of the out of school literacy practices and that reading, drawing and play featured as contributing practices towards their creative writing. Furthermore through Bakhtin's notion of appropriation and Kristeva's notion of intertextuality, I analysed how popular culture featured prominently in the boy's writing as a means of expressing not only their own individual interests, but as a resource for identity work, representing the ways in which they see themselves in their official world as well. This research hopes to encourage further research into children's creative writing in order to change the way in which writing is viewed in the South African curriculum and to chal lenge teacher's perceptions on what constitutes "good" creative writing among primary school children. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Education en_ZA
dc.title The out of school literacy practices and semiotic resources of two grade 4 boys who excel at creative writing en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department School of Education en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MEd en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Abdulla, N. (2017). <i>The out of school literacy practices and semiotic resources of two grade 4 boys who excel at creative writing</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,School of Education. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24991 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Abdulla, Nabila. <i>"The out of school literacy practices and semiotic resources of two grade 4 boys who excel at creative writing."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,School of Education, 2017. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24991 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Abdulla N. The out of school literacy practices and semiotic resources of two grade 4 boys who excel at creative writing. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,School of Education, 2017 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24991 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Abdulla, Nabila AB - Previous socio-cultural research has shown the importance of creative writing and that children's creative writing is fuelled by their interests . It is believed that reading and writing is intimately connected and that those who can read well should be able to write well and vice versa. However, teachers have argued that those who do read tend to fill their writing with elements of popular culture, and those who read extensively aren't all capable of producing quality fictional writing either, as the skills and knowledge which they develop from reading don't necessarily translate into their writing. Through my teaching experiences I discovered a general negativity amongst South African teachers towards creative writing. Furthermore, the South African curriculum seems to provide little support for the advancement in creative writing as well. As a result I became interested in two of my learners, both boys, who excel at creative writing. Their narratives are rich in detail, contain exciting plots, and are generally entertaining and engaging reads. Both boys are avid readers as well. I questioned what contributed to their ability to produce excellent narratives as reading could not be the only factor. As I was aware of their in-school practices I decided it would be beneficial to examine their out of school literacy practices and semiotic resources and whether they affect or contribute towards their creative writing. I developed a case study based on home visits, interviews and collecting artefacts. I discovered that family social practices underpin many of the out of school literacy practices and that reading, drawing and play featured as contributing practices towards their creative writing. Furthermore through Bakhtin's notion of appropriation and Kristeva's notion of intertextuality, I analysed how popular culture featured prominently in the boy's writing as a means of expressing not only their own individual interests, but as a resource for identity work, representing the ways in which they see themselves in their official world as well. This research hopes to encourage further research into children's creative writing in order to change the way in which writing is viewed in the South African curriculum and to chal lenge teacher's perceptions on what constitutes "good" creative writing among primary school children. DA - 2017 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2017 T1 - The out of school literacy practices and semiotic resources of two grade 4 boys who excel at creative writing TI - The out of school literacy practices and semiotic resources of two grade 4 boys who excel at creative writing UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24991 ER - en_ZA


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