The impact of coastal grabbing on community conservation – a global reconnaissance

 

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dc.contributor.author Bavinck, Maarten
dc.contributor.author Berkes, Fikret
dc.contributor.author Charles, Anthony
dc.contributor.author Dias, Ana C E
dc.contributor.author Doubleday, Nancy
dc.contributor.author Nayak, Prateep
dc.contributor.author Sowman, Merle
dc.date.accessioned 2017-06-26T08:35:40Z
dc.date.available 2017-06-26T08:35:40Z
dc.date.issued 2017-06-14
dc.identifier.citation Bavinck, M., Berkes, F., Charles, A., Dias, A. C. E., Doubleday, N., Nayak, P., & Sowman, M. (2017). The impact of coastal grabbing on community conservation–a global reconnaissance. Maritime Studies, 16(1), 8.
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40152-017-0062-8
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24632
dc.description.abstract "Coastal grab" refers to the contested appropriation of coastal (shore and inshore) space and resources by outside interests. This paper explores the phenomenon of coastal grabbing and the effects of such appropriation on community-based conservation of local resources and environment. The approach combines social-ecological systems analysis with socio-legal property rights studies. Evidence of coastal grab is provided from four country settings (Canada, Brazil, India and South Africa), distinguishing the identity of the 'grabbers' (industry, government) and 'victims', the scale and intensity of the process, and the resultant 'booty'. The paper also considers the responses of the communities. While emphasizing the scale of coastal grab and its deleterious consequences for local communities and their conservation efforts, the paper also recognizes the strength of community responses, and the alliances/partnerships with academia and civil society, which assist in countering some of the negative effects.
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher Springer Berlin Heidelberg
dc.subject.other Coastal grabbing
dc.subject.other Community-based conservation
dc.subject.other Social-ecological systems
dc.subject.other Socio-legal studies
dc.subject.other Property rights
dc.subject.other Canada
dc.subject.other Brazil
dc.subject.other India
dc.subject.other South Africa
dc.title The impact of coastal grabbing on community conservation – a global reconnaissance
dc.type Journal Article
dc.date.updated 2017-06-18T03:17:21Z
dc.rights.holder The Author(s).
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Environmental and Geographical Science en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Bavinck, M., Berkes, F., Charles, A., Dias, A. C. E., Doubleday, N., Nayak, P., & Sowman, M. (2017). The impact of coastal grabbing on community conservation – a global reconnaissance. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24632 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Bavinck, Maarten, Fikret Berkes, Anthony Charles, Ana C E Dias, Nancy Doubleday, Prateep Nayak, and Merle Sowman "The impact of coastal grabbing on community conservation – a global reconnaissance." (2017) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24632 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Bavinck M, Berkes F, Charles A, Dias ACE, Doubleday N, Nayak P, et al. The impact of coastal grabbing on community conservation – a global reconnaissance. 2017; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24632. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Bavinck, Maarten AU - Berkes, Fikret AU - Charles, Anthony AU - Dias, Ana C E AU - Doubleday, Nancy AU - Nayak, Prateep AU - Sowman, Merle AB - "Coastal grab" refers to the contested appropriation of coastal (shore and inshore) space and resources by outside interests. This paper explores the phenomenon of coastal grabbing and the effects of such appropriation on community-based conservation of local resources and environment. The approach combines social-ecological systems analysis with socio-legal property rights studies. Evidence of coastal grab is provided from four country settings (Canada, Brazil, India and South Africa), distinguishing the identity of the 'grabbers' (industry, government) and 'victims', the scale and intensity of the process, and the resultant 'booty'. The paper also considers the responses of the communities. While emphasizing the scale of coastal grab and its deleterious consequences for local communities and their conservation efforts, the paper also recognizes the strength of community responses, and the alliances/partnerships with academia and civil society, which assist in countering some of the negative effects. DA - 2017-06-14 DB - OpenUCT DO - 10.1186/s40152-017-0062-8 DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2017 T1 - The impact of coastal grabbing on community conservation – a global reconnaissance TI - The impact of coastal grabbing on community conservation – a global reconnaissance UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24632 ER - en_ZA


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