Admission trends at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town: 2004 to 2013

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Myer, Landon en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Zar, Heather J en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Isaacs, Yumnah en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2017-06-06T09:45:53Z
dc.date.available 2017-06-06T09:45:53Z
dc.date.issued 2016 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Isaacs, Y. 2016. Admission trends at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town: 2004 to 2013. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24505
dc.description.abstract Background: Hospital database research has the potential to provide useful insights into health systems functioning, population health, clinical conditions and epidemiological trends thereof. This type of research is routinely done in countries that have large national hospital databases where results are usually extrapolated to the national population. South Africa does not have a national hospital database, but individual healthcare institutions, such as the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital (RCCH) in Cape Town, collects routine patient data in a computerised database that if tapped should yield valuable information about child health of the catchment population as well as of the functioning of that health institution. Methods: Selected data from the RCCH database were converted into spreadsheet format and then exported into a statistical programme, Stata. Variables included patient demographic details, ICD-10 diagnostic codes, length of hospital stay and outcomes at discharge. Stata was used to clean and code the data and perform basic descriptive analyses of contained variables. Medians and interquartile ranges described numerical variables. Frequencies, proportions and percentages described categorical variables. Appropriate tests of statistical significance were performed where applicable. Admission and mortality trends were analysed across a decade and common conditions were explored. Findings and Conclusions: Overall admissions to RCCH increased by 9.3% across a decade while the number of new patients decreased by 8.6%, indicating an increase in readmissions. In-patient mortality decreased consistently across a decade despite an increase in admissions, which suggests an improvement in quality of care. The median ages of admissions and deaths increased across the decade, which correlates with less HIV and improved management thereof. Infections remain the commonest causes of in-hospital mortality. Admissions and mortality for diarrhoea and pneumonia displayed a consistent decline across 6 years corresponding with the introduction of new vaccines; however, diarrhoea and lower respiratory tract illness remained the commonest causes of medical admission. Injuries were the commonest reason for surgical admissions. Computerised hospital databases contain useful information for healthcare research. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Public Health en_ZA
dc.title Admission trends at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town: 2004 to 2013 en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Public Health and Family Medicine en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MPH en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Isaacs, Y. (2016). <i>Admission trends at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town: 2004 to 2013</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Public Health and Family Medicine. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24505 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Isaacs, Yumnah. <i>"Admission trends at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town: 2004 to 2013."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Public Health and Family Medicine, 2016. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24505 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Isaacs Y. Admission trends at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town: 2004 to 2013. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Public Health and Family Medicine, 2016 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24505 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Isaacs, Yumnah AB - Background: Hospital database research has the potential to provide useful insights into health systems functioning, population health, clinical conditions and epidemiological trends thereof. This type of research is routinely done in countries that have large national hospital databases where results are usually extrapolated to the national population. South Africa does not have a national hospital database, but individual healthcare institutions, such as the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital (RCCH) in Cape Town, collects routine patient data in a computerised database that if tapped should yield valuable information about child health of the catchment population as well as of the functioning of that health institution. Methods: Selected data from the RCCH database were converted into spreadsheet format and then exported into a statistical programme, Stata. Variables included patient demographic details, ICD-10 diagnostic codes, length of hospital stay and outcomes at discharge. Stata was used to clean and code the data and perform basic descriptive analyses of contained variables. Medians and interquartile ranges described numerical variables. Frequencies, proportions and percentages described categorical variables. Appropriate tests of statistical significance were performed where applicable. Admission and mortality trends were analysed across a decade and common conditions were explored. Findings and Conclusions: Overall admissions to RCCH increased by 9.3% across a decade while the number of new patients decreased by 8.6%, indicating an increase in readmissions. In-patient mortality decreased consistently across a decade despite an increase in admissions, which suggests an improvement in quality of care. The median ages of admissions and deaths increased across the decade, which correlates with less HIV and improved management thereof. Infections remain the commonest causes of in-hospital mortality. Admissions and mortality for diarrhoea and pneumonia displayed a consistent decline across 6 years corresponding with the introduction of new vaccines; however, diarrhoea and lower respiratory tract illness remained the commonest causes of medical admission. Injuries were the commonest reason for surgical admissions. Computerised hospital databases contain useful information for healthcare research. DA - 2016 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2016 T1 - Admission trends at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town: 2004 to 2013 TI - Admission trends at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town: 2004 to 2013 UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24505 ER - en_ZA


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