Digital journalism and online public spheres in South Africa

 

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dc.contributor.author Bosch, Tanja
dc.date.accessioned 2017-06-05T11:14:34Z
dc.date.available 2017-06-05T11:14:34Z
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02500167.2010.485374
dc.identifier.citation Bosch, T. (2010). Digital journalism and online public spheres in South Africa. Communicatio: South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research, 36(2), 265-275.
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24472
dc.description.abstract This article explores and evaluates the growth of digital journalism in South Africa, within the context of increased use of online social media in the field. Increasingly, local activists are using mobile and online social networking to promote their events and causes, and reach their constituencies. Similarly, journalists are using digital media to practise their craft, reach new audiences, and sometimes even to change the notion of who practises journalism, as in the case of citizen journalism. South African journalists, via community media and sometimes even tabloid newspapers, have long embraced the notion of civic or community journalism, framing news ‘in a way that facilitates people thinking about solutions, not just problems and conflict’ (Hoyt 1995). With the rise of Web 2.0 and increased access to the Internet, digital journalism in South Africa has spread to include a strong focus on user-generated content, with traditional news media using Twitter and other social media to generate reader feedback. Similarly, the Mail & Guardian ‘Thoughtleader’ blog, originally designed for socalled J-bloggers, is another example of the ‘convergence’ between journalism and social media. The article provides an overview of emerging trends and theories in the South African context, focusing particularly on the public sphere created by bloggers, the citizen journalism of MyNews24.com and journalists' engagement with online social media. Furthermore, the article reflects on the possibility that online news sites and blogs may represent a space for the creation of online public spheres in South Africa.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.source Communicatio: South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research
dc.source.uri http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02500167.2010.485374
dc.subject.other Citizen journalism
dc.subject.other digital journalism
dc.subject.other social media
dc.subject.other Twitter
dc.subject.other Web 2.0
dc.title Digital journalism and online public spheres in South Africa
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2016-01-11T08:59:55Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Centre for Film and Media Studies en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Bosch, T. (2010). Digital journalism and online public spheres in South Africa. <i>Communicatio: South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24472 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Bosch, Tanja "Digital journalism and online public spheres in South Africa." <i>Communicatio: South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research</i> (2010) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24472 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Bosch T. Digital journalism and online public spheres in South Africa. Communicatio: South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research. 2010; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24472. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Bosch, Tanja AB - This article explores and evaluates the growth of digital journalism in South Africa, within the context of increased use of online social media in the field. Increasingly, local activists are using mobile and online social networking to promote their events and causes, and reach their constituencies. Similarly, journalists are using digital media to practise their craft, reach new audiences, and sometimes even to change the notion of who practises journalism, as in the case of citizen journalism. South African journalists, via community media and sometimes even tabloid newspapers, have long embraced the notion of civic or community journalism, framing news ‘in a way that facilitates people thinking about solutions, not just problems and conflict’ (Hoyt 1995). With the rise of Web 2.0 and increased access to the Internet, digital journalism in South Africa has spread to include a strong focus on user-generated content, with traditional news media using Twitter and other social media to generate reader feedback. Similarly, the Mail & Guardian ‘Thoughtleader’ blog, originally designed for socalled J-bloggers, is another example of the ‘convergence’ between journalism and social media. The article provides an overview of emerging trends and theories in the South African context, focusing particularly on the public sphere created by bloggers, the citizen journalism of MyNews24.com and journalists' engagement with online social media. Furthermore, the article reflects on the possibility that online news sites and blogs may represent a space for the creation of online public spheres in South Africa. DA - 2010 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - Communicatio: South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2010 T1 - Digital journalism and online public spheres in South Africa TI - Digital journalism and online public spheres in South Africa UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24472 ER - en_ZA


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