Citizenship without representation? Blackface, misogyny and parody in Die Antwoord, Lupé Fiasco and Angel Haze

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Haupt, Adam
dc.date.accessioned 2017-05-29T11:14:38Z
dc.date.available 2017-05-29T11:14:38Z
dc.date.issued 2013
dc.identifier http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02500167.2013.852599
dc.identifier.citation Haupt, A. (2013). Citizenship without representation? Blackface, misogyny and parody in Die Antwoord, Lupé Fiasco and Angel Haze. Communicatio, 39(4), 466-482.
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24428
dc.description.abstract This article explores Die Antwoord's blackface politics to question whether the concept of citizenship has any value in a context where marginal artists’ attempts to represent themselves on their own terms are overshadowed by the global reach of corporate entertainment media monopolies, and by the legacy of racism and sexism in the music industry. It analyses the work of Die Antwoord, Lupé Fiasco and Angel Haze to contend that global capital undermines the nation-state's ability to secure its citizens’ economic or cultural interests. Using Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri's concept of Empire, the author argues that corporate globalisation undermines the sovereignty of the nation-state, effectively compromising democratic ideals. The global appeal of Die Antwoord tells us a great deal about the extent to which diverse cultural expressions are marginalised, as well as the extent to which colonial conceptions of race, gender and class endear in public discourse – specifically in light of the continuing appeal of blackface in the mainstream entertainment industry.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.source Communicatio: South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research
dc.source.uri http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rcsa20/current
dc.subject.other Angel Haze
dc.subject.other blackface
dc.subject.other Die Antwoord
dc.subject.other Lupé Fiasco
dc.subject.other minstrelsy
dc.subject.other misogyny
dc.subject.other parody
dc.title Citizenship without representation? Blackface, misogyny and parody in Die Antwoord, Lupé Fiasco and Angel Haze
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2016-01-08T11:32:15Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Centre for Film and Media Studies en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Haupt, A. (2013). Citizenship without representation? Blackface, misogyny and parody in Die Antwoord, Lupé Fiasco and Angel Haze. <i>Communicatio: South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24428 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Haupt, Adam "Citizenship without representation? Blackface, misogyny and parody in Die Antwoord, Lupé Fiasco and Angel Haze." <i>Communicatio: South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research</i> (2013) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24428 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Haupt A. Citizenship without representation? Blackface, misogyny and parody in Die Antwoord, Lupé Fiasco and Angel Haze. Communicatio: South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research. 2013; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24428. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Haupt, Adam AB - This article explores Die Antwoord's blackface politics to question whether the concept of citizenship has any value in a context where marginal artists’ attempts to represent themselves on their own terms are overshadowed by the global reach of corporate entertainment media monopolies, and by the legacy of racism and sexism in the music industry. It analyses the work of Die Antwoord, Lupé Fiasco and Angel Haze to contend that global capital undermines the nation-state's ability to secure its citizens’ economic or cultural interests. Using Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri's concept of Empire, the author argues that corporate globalisation undermines the sovereignty of the nation-state, effectively compromising democratic ideals. The global appeal of Die Antwoord tells us a great deal about the extent to which diverse cultural expressions are marginalised, as well as the extent to which colonial conceptions of race, gender and class endear in public discourse – specifically in light of the continuing appeal of blackface in the mainstream entertainment industry. DA - 2013 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - Communicatio: South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2013 T1 - Citizenship without representation? Blackface, misogyny and parody in Die Antwoord, Lupé Fiasco and Angel Haze TI - Citizenship without representation? Blackface, misogyny and parody in Die Antwoord, Lupé Fiasco and Angel Haze UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24428 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record