The long-term effect of elevated CO₂ on grassland biomass production

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Stock, WD en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Asary, Melanie en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2017-05-24T07:08:56Z
dc.date.available 2017-05-24T07:08:56Z
dc.date.issued 1996 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Asary, M. 1996. The long-term effect of elevated CO₂ on grassland biomass production. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24401
dc.description.abstract This study investigates the influence of elevated CO₂ on grassland biomass production at a naturally elevated CO₂ spring situated on the Bongwan gas fault in Natal. The effect of elevated CO₂ on monocotyledenous (C₄) and dicotyledenous (C₃) above ground plant biomass production and their dominance patterns along a CO₂ gradient were studied. Three 7x7m plots were located 18m, 39m and 73m away from the elevated CO₂ spring. The 18m site was the experimental site, while the other two sites were the controls. The primary focus of the study was to determine the biomass production of monocotyledenous and dicotyledenous plants at the above-mentioned distance from the spring. However, to ascertain possible factors that could influence the increase in biomass production with distance from the CO₂ source, plant nutrient analyses (N and P), soil moisture contents (which could have an effect on plant wateruse efficiency) and carbon isotope discrimination values were determined at the three sites. The results show that elevated CO₂ had a significant effect on the monocotyledenous dry matter production, but had no significant effect on any of the other plants or soil. It was also shown that elevated CO₂ increased the soil water retention capacity as one moves toward the spring, however this result is not confirmed. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Botany en_ZA
dc.title The long-term effect of elevated CO₂ on grassland biomass production en_ZA
dc.type Bachelor Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Biological Sciences en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Honours
dc.type.qualificationname BSc (Hons.) en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Asary, M. (1996). <i>The long-term effect of elevated CO₂ on grassland biomass production</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24401 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Asary, Melanie. <i>"The long-term effect of elevated CO₂ on grassland biomass production."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 1996. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24401 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Asary M. The long-term effect of elevated CO₂ on grassland biomass production. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 1996 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24401 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Asary, Melanie AB - This study investigates the influence of elevated CO₂ on grassland biomass production at a naturally elevated CO₂ spring situated on the Bongwan gas fault in Natal. The effect of elevated CO₂ on monocotyledenous (C₄) and dicotyledenous (C₃) above ground plant biomass production and their dominance patterns along a CO₂ gradient were studied. Three 7x7m plots were located 18m, 39m and 73m away from the elevated CO₂ spring. The 18m site was the experimental site, while the other two sites were the controls. The primary focus of the study was to determine the biomass production of monocotyledenous and dicotyledenous plants at the above-mentioned distance from the spring. However, to ascertain possible factors that could influence the increase in biomass production with distance from the CO₂ source, plant nutrient analyses (N and P), soil moisture contents (which could have an effect on plant wateruse efficiency) and carbon isotope discrimination values were determined at the three sites. The results show that elevated CO₂ had a significant effect on the monocotyledenous dry matter production, but had no significant effect on any of the other plants or soil. It was also shown that elevated CO₂ increased the soil water retention capacity as one moves toward the spring, however this result is not confirmed. DA - 1996 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1996 T1 - The long-term effect of elevated CO₂ on grassland biomass production TI - The long-term effect of elevated CO₂ on grassland biomass production UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24401 ER - en_ZA


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