South African cinema after apartheid: A politicaleconomic exploration

 

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dc.contributor.author Treffry-Goatley, Astrid
dc.date.accessioned 2017-05-05T13:07:05Z
dc.date.available 2017-05-05T13:07:05Z
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02500160903525023
dc.identifier.citation Treffry-Goatley, A. (2010). South African cinema after apartheid: A political-economic exploration. Communicatio: South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research, 36(1), 37-57.
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24244
dc.description.abstract When South Africa was emancipated from the oppressive apartheid regime in 1994, it was a severely divided society in need of an inclusive national identity to bind its citizens and maintain peace. Therefore, the state targeted the cultural industries, including film, as a means of promoting symbolic representations of national unity. The film industry was further identified as a priority sector for economic growth and as a potential platform for equitable redress. This article discusses existing and emerging finance, distribution and exhibition structures in the post-apartheid film industry. It considers government interventions in the form of film policies and development strategies with the purpose of examining the influence of globalising forces, in particular neoliberalism, on the apparent market-orientation of such interventions. The results presented indicate that the post-apartheid vision of equality, freedom and diversity does not always sit comfortably with the neoliberal, free-market principles promoted in the Growth, Employment and Redistribution (GEAR) programme of 1996. Moreover, it suggests that in this commercial environment, the voices of the historically oppressed black majority, rather than enjoying a sense of artistic and creative freedom, can in fact encounter commercial censorship through the commodification of films for an export-orientated market.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.source Communicatio: South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research
dc.source.uri http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rcsa20
dc.subject.other equality
dc.subject.other film industry
dc.subject.other freedom
dc.subject.other globalisation
dc.subject.other multiculturalism
dc.subject.other multilingualism
dc.subject.other national identity
dc.title South African cinema after apartheid: A politicaleconomic exploration
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2016-01-07T10:38:57Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Centre for Film and Media Studies en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Treffry-Goatley, A. (2010). South African cinema after apartheid: A politicaleconomic exploration. <i>Communicatio: South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24244 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Treffry-Goatley, Astrid "South African cinema after apartheid: A politicaleconomic exploration." <i>Communicatio: South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research</i> (2010) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24244 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Treffry-Goatley A. South African cinema after apartheid: A politicaleconomic exploration. Communicatio: South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research. 2010; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24244. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Treffry-Goatley, Astrid AB - When South Africa was emancipated from the oppressive apartheid regime in 1994, it was a severely divided society in need of an inclusive national identity to bind its citizens and maintain peace. Therefore, the state targeted the cultural industries, including film, as a means of promoting symbolic representations of national unity. The film industry was further identified as a priority sector for economic growth and as a potential platform for equitable redress. This article discusses existing and emerging finance, distribution and exhibition structures in the post-apartheid film industry. It considers government interventions in the form of film policies and development strategies with the purpose of examining the influence of globalising forces, in particular neoliberalism, on the apparent market-orientation of such interventions. The results presented indicate that the post-apartheid vision of equality, freedom and diversity does not always sit comfortably with the neoliberal, free-market principles promoted in the Growth, Employment and Redistribution (GEAR) programme of 1996. Moreover, it suggests that in this commercial environment, the voices of the historically oppressed black majority, rather than enjoying a sense of artistic and creative freedom, can in fact encounter commercial censorship through the commodification of films for an export-orientated market. DA - 2010 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - Communicatio: South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2010 T1 - South African cinema after apartheid: A politicaleconomic exploration TI - South African cinema after apartheid: A politicaleconomic exploration UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24244 ER - en_ZA


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