The world is not enough: Knowledge in question

 

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dc.contributor.author Muller, J
dc.date.accessioned 2017-04-20T09:27:21Z
dc.date.available 2017-04-20T09:27:21Z
dc.date.issued 2005
dc.identifier.citation Muller, J. (2005). The world is not enough: knowledge in question. South African Journal of Higher Education, 19(3), p-89.
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24200
dc.description.abstract This article sounds a warning about threats to the continued good health of the Humanities globally, but especially in South Africa. It begins by examining the `canonical position' of the knowledge enterprise and the academy, namely, that innovation can only be driven from within, not from without. This establishes the idea that a healthy academia requires `necessary distance' from endogenous interests and agents, principally the state and the market, in order to survive. The article goes on to discuss contemporary threats to `necessary distance', ranging from changes in the global model of university governance, to pressures for external attunement to external needs, the market, or to `relevance', resulting in a new strategic regime of science. It next proceeds to review South African empirical work that assesses the degree to which the relevance imperative has had an impact in South Africa, and concludes that although curriculum change has by and large been patchy, that patterns in research and publishing show an alarming tendency to `follow the money'. It is suggested that some disciplines are able to respond to relevance pressures whilst maintaining their disciplinary integrity more easily that others. One cluster of disciplines that is manifestly not thriving is the Humanities. An explanation for this incapacity is sought in the concept of knowledge structure, which is related to differential capacity for external attunement. The article concludes that, under the present strategic regime of science, the Humanities seem damned if they do and damned if they don't.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.source South African Journal of Higher Education
dc.source.uri http://www.journals.ac.za/index.php/sajhe
dc.title The world is not enough: Knowledge in question
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2016-01-05T10:35:50Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department School of Education en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Muller, J. (2005). The world is not enough: Knowledge in question. <i>South African Journal of Higher Education</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24200 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Muller, J "The world is not enough: Knowledge in question." <i>South African Journal of Higher Education</i> (2005) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24200 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Muller J. The world is not enough: Knowledge in question. South African Journal of Higher Education. 2005; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24200. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Muller, J AB - This article sounds a warning about threats to the continued good health of the Humanities globally, but especially in South Africa. It begins by examining the `canonical position' of the knowledge enterprise and the academy, namely, that innovation can only be driven from within, not from without. This establishes the idea that a healthy academia requires `necessary distance' from endogenous interests and agents, principally the state and the market, in order to survive. The article goes on to discuss contemporary threats to `necessary distance', ranging from changes in the global model of university governance, to pressures for external attunement to external needs, the market, or to `relevance', resulting in a new strategic regime of science. It next proceeds to review South African empirical work that assesses the degree to which the relevance imperative has had an impact in South Africa, and concludes that although curriculum change has by and large been patchy, that patterns in research and publishing show an alarming tendency to `follow the money'. It is suggested that some disciplines are able to respond to relevance pressures whilst maintaining their disciplinary integrity more easily that others. One cluster of disciplines that is manifestly not thriving is the Humanities. An explanation for this incapacity is sought in the concept of knowledge structure, which is related to differential capacity for external attunement. The article concludes that, under the present strategic regime of science, the Humanities seem damned if they do and damned if they don't. DA - 2005 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - South African Journal of Higher Education LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2005 T1 - The world is not enough: Knowledge in question TI - The world is not enough: Knowledge in question UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24200 ER - en_ZA


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