WikiLeaks in MENA

 

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dc.contributor.author Saleh, Ibrahim en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-07-24T11:59:20Z
dc.date.available 2014-07-24T11:59:20Z
dc.date.issued 2011 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Saleh, I. 2011. WikiLeaks in MENA. Reading. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/2417
dc.description.abstract The situation MENA has been reshuffled from Ben Ali exiled, Mubarak fallen, Gaddafi genocidal, Bahrain recruiting the Saudi military, Yemen using nerve gas, Syria arresting bloggers at random; many other regimes all over the region either attempting to bridge the gap with reform, or steadfastly refusing to see their people rise. To understand this broader phenomenon of protests that have swept through North Africa and parts of the Middle East, one must consider the causality between the two key variables of the revolution: media texts and political change. Two questions are answer the claim of social media and change in the Arab Spring: 1. Has WikiLeaks influenced the uprisings in the Middle East and North Africa? 2. What is the role of Journalism? en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.rights Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 South Africa en_ZA
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5/za/ en_ZA
dc.source.uri https://vula.uct.ac.za/access/content/user/01424885/Profile/DrIbrahim%20Saleh%20Readings%202011/WikiLeaks%20in%20MENA-Small%20Connections%20and%20Big%20Changes.pdf en_ZA
dc.subject.other journalism practice en_ZA
dc.subject.other Middle East & North Africa (MENA) en_ZA
dc.subject.other socio-political & economic setting en_ZA
dc.subject.other WikiLeaks en_ZA
dc.title WikiLeaks in MENA en_ZA
dc.type Other en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Reading en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Centre for Film and Media Studies en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation 2011. <i>WikiLeaks in MENA.</i> http://hdl.handle.net/11427/2417 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation . 2011. <i>WikiLeaks in MENA.</i> http://hdl.handle.net/11427/2417 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation . 2011. <i>WikiLeaks in MENA.</i> http://hdl.handle.net/11427/2417 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Other AU - Saleh, Ibrahim AB - The situation MENA has been reshuffled from Ben Ali exiled, Mubarak fallen, Gaddafi genocidal, Bahrain recruiting the Saudi military, Yemen using nerve gas, Syria arresting bloggers at random; many other regimes all over the region either attempting to bridge the gap with reform, or steadfastly refusing to see their people rise. To understand this broader phenomenon of protests that have swept through North Africa and parts of the Middle East, one must consider the causality between the two key variables of the revolution: media texts and political change. Two questions are answer the claim of social media and change in the Arab Spring: 1. Has WikiLeaks influenced the uprisings in the Middle East and North Africa? 2. What is the role of Journalism? DA - 2011 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2011 T1 - WikiLeaks in MENA TI - WikiLeaks in MENA UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/2417 ER - en_ZA


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