Occupational post-exposure HIV prophylaxis

 

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dc.contributor.author Maartens, Gary
dc.date.accessioned 2017-04-05T06:25:50Z
dc.date.available 2017-04-05T06:25:50Z
dc.date.issued 2004
dc.identifier.citation Maartens, G. (2004). Occupational post-exposure HIV prophylaxis: clinical practice: SAMJ forum. South African Medical Journal, 94(8), p-626.
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24153
dc.description.abstract HIV and other bloodborne infectious agents, such as hepatitis B or C, can be transmitted to health care workers during occupational exposure. In all occupational exposure incidents proper documentation is essential in order to claim compensation at a later date. This article is limited to a brief overview of the medical management of occupational exposure to HIV only. The risk of a health care worker acquiring HIV following percutaneous occupational exposure is 0.3%.1 The risk following mucous membrane exposure is 0.09%.1 Zidovudine postexposure reduces the risk of acquiring HIV by about 80%.2 The current approach to post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is to stratify the exposures by risk and to treat accordingly. In many instances PEP is not indicated.
dc.source South African Medical Journal
dc.source.uri http://www.samj.org.za
dc.title Occupational post-exposure HIV prophylaxis
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2016-01-18T08:27:19Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Division of Clinical Pharmacology en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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