Prejudice and social contact in South Africa: A study of integrated schools ten years after apartheid

 

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dc.contributor.author Holtman, Zelda
dc.contributor.author Louw, Johann
dc.contributor.author Tredoux, Colin
dc.contributor.author Carney, Tara
dc.date.accessioned 2017-04-03T06:44:40Z
dc.date.available 2017-04-03T06:44:40Z
dc.date.issued 2005
dc.identifier.citation Holtman, Z., Louw, J., Tredoux, C., & Carney, T. (2005). Prejudice and social contact in South Africa: A study of integrated schools ten years after apartheid. South African Journal of Psychology, 35(3), p-473.
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24132
dc.description.abstract In this article the relationship between intergroup contact and racial prejudice in formerly segregated schools in Cape Town, South Africa, is investigated. A total of 1 119 black African, coloured, Afrikaans-speaking and English-speaking white learners were surveyed, using three measures of intergroup prejudice, a self-report intergroup contact measure and a racial identifi cation scale. In general, quality of contact with individuals of other race groups and an increase in contact both in and outside of the school improved learners’ race attitudes. Higher levels of demographic integration within schools were also positively related to race attitudes, but a high degree of identifi cation with one’s own race led in several instances to less positive attitudes towards other race groups. Intergroup contact seemed to be the single most important predictor of attitudes for all four groups in this study
dc.language.iso eng
dc.source South African Journal of Psychology
dc.source.uri http://reference.sabinet.co.za/sa_epublication/sapsyc
dc.subject.other Attitudes as predictors
dc.subject.other Desegregated schools
dc.subject.other Intergroup contact
dc.subject.other Prejudice
dc.subject.other Racial identification
dc.title Prejudice and social contact in South Africa: A study of integrated schools ten years after apartheid
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2016-01-05T08:18:14Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Psychology en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Holtman, Z., Louw, J., Tredoux, C., & Carney, T. (2005). Prejudice and social contact in South Africa: A study of integrated schools ten years after apartheid. <i>South African Journal of Psychology</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24132 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Holtman, Zelda, Johann Louw, Colin Tredoux, and Tara Carney "Prejudice and social contact in South Africa: A study of integrated schools ten years after apartheid." <i>South African Journal of Psychology</i> (2005) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24132 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Holtman Z, Louw J, Tredoux C, Carney T. Prejudice and social contact in South Africa: A study of integrated schools ten years after apartheid. South African Journal of Psychology. 2005; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24132. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Holtman, Zelda AU - Louw, Johann AU - Tredoux, Colin AU - Carney, Tara AB - In this article the relationship between intergroup contact and racial prejudice in formerly segregated schools in Cape Town, South Africa, is investigated. A total of 1 119 black African, coloured, Afrikaans-speaking and English-speaking white learners were surveyed, using three measures of intergroup prejudice, a self-report intergroup contact measure and a racial identifi cation scale. In general, quality of contact with individuals of other race groups and an increase in contact both in and outside of the school improved learners’ race attitudes. Higher levels of demographic integration within schools were also positively related to race attitudes, but a high degree of identifi cation with one’s own race led in several instances to less positive attitudes towards other race groups. Intergroup contact seemed to be the single most important predictor of attitudes for all four groups in this study DA - 2005 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - South African Journal of Psychology LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2005 T1 - Prejudice and social contact in South Africa: A study of integrated schools ten years after apartheid TI - Prejudice and social contact in South Africa: A study of integrated schools ten years after apartheid UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24132 ER - en_ZA


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