Functional foods with added plant sterols for treatment of hypercholesterolaemia and prevention of ischaemic heart disease

 

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dc.contributor.author Vorster, H H
dc.contributor.author Raal, D
dc.contributor.author Ubbink, J
dc.contributor.author Marais, A D
dc.contributor.author Rajput, M C
dc.contributor.author Ntanios, F Y
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-28T07:57:22Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-28T07:57:22Z
dc.date.issued 2003
dc.identifier.citation Vorster, H. H., Raal, F. J., Ubbink, J. B., Marais, A. D., Rajput, M. C., & Ntanios, F. Y. (2007). Functional foods with added plant sterols for treatment of hypercholesterolaemia and prevention of ischaemic heart disease. South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24105
dc.identifier.uri http://www.sajcn.com/index.php/SAJCN/article/view/54
dc.description.abstract Background. A spread with added plant sterols, Pro-activ, is marketed in South Africa as an adjunct to low-fat diets for lowering of total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations and to decrease risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD). Objectives. The need for this functional food in South Africa, its efficacy, safety and target market, are evaluated in this review. Results. The high, and probably increasing incidence of hypercholesterolaemia and cardiovascular disease in South Africa motivates the need for appropriate functional foods. There is convincing evidence in the literature that an average daily intake of about 2 g plant sterols in about 20 g of spread significantly lowers total and LDL cholesterol concentrations by approximately 10 - 15%, without influencing high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations. There is some concern about the effects on absorption of lipid-soluble vitamins and pro-vitamins, but safety tests lasting for up to 3 years found no serious adverse effects. Conclusions. The target market for this spread should be nonpregnant, non-lactating adults with hypercholesterolaemia and/or increased risk of IHD. If it is considered for use in hypercholesterolaemic children, fat-soluble vitamin status should be monitored. It is recommended that post-marketing surveillance should be established to determine long-term effects and safety.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.source South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition
dc.source.uri http://www.sajcn.com/index.php/SAJCN/index
dc.title Functional foods with added plant sterols for treatment of hypercholesterolaemia and prevention of ischaemic heart disease
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2015-12-24T09:06:51Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Medicine en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Vorster, H. H., Raal, D., Ubbink, J., Marais, A. D., Rajput, M. C., & Ntanios, F. Y. (2003). Functional foods with added plant sterols for treatment of hypercholesterolaemia and prevention of ischaemic heart disease. <i>South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24105 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Vorster, H H, D Raal, J Ubbink, A D Marais, M C Rajput, and F Y Ntanios "Functional foods with added plant sterols for treatment of hypercholesterolaemia and prevention of ischaemic heart disease." <i>South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition</i> (2003) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24105 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Vorster HH, Raal D, Ubbink J, Marais AD, Rajput MC, Ntanios FY. Functional foods with added plant sterols for treatment of hypercholesterolaemia and prevention of ischaemic heart disease. South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2003; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24105. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Vorster, H H AU - Raal, D AU - Ubbink, J AU - Marais, A D AU - Rajput, M C AU - Ntanios, F Y AB - Background. A spread with added plant sterols, Pro-activ, is marketed in South Africa as an adjunct to low-fat diets for lowering of total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations and to decrease risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD). Objectives. The need for this functional food in South Africa, its efficacy, safety and target market, are evaluated in this review. Results. The high, and probably increasing incidence of hypercholesterolaemia and cardiovascular disease in South Africa motivates the need for appropriate functional foods. There is convincing evidence in the literature that an average daily intake of about 2 g plant sterols in about 20 g of spread significantly lowers total and LDL cholesterol concentrations by approximately 10 - 15%, without influencing high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations. There is some concern about the effects on absorption of lipid-soluble vitamins and pro-vitamins, but safety tests lasting for up to 3 years found no serious adverse effects. Conclusions. The target market for this spread should be nonpregnant, non-lactating adults with hypercholesterolaemia and/or increased risk of IHD. If it is considered for use in hypercholesterolaemic children, fat-soluble vitamin status should be monitored. It is recommended that post-marketing surveillance should be established to determine long-term effects and safety. DA - 2003 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2003 T1 - Functional foods with added plant sterols for treatment of hypercholesterolaemia and prevention of ischaemic heart disease TI - Functional foods with added plant sterols for treatment of hypercholesterolaemia and prevention of ischaemic heart disease UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24105 ER - en_ZA


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