Paying to play - the pricing policies of casinos

 

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dc.contributor.author Barr, G D I
dc.contributor.author Kantor, B S
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-28T06:55:13Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-28T06:55:13Z
dc.date.issued 2003
dc.identifier http://dx.doi.org/DOI: 10.1111/j.1813-6982.2003.tb01312.x
dc.identifier.citation Barr, G. D. I., & Kantor, B. S. (2003). Paying to Play‐the Pricing Policies of Casinos*(1). South African journal of economics, 71(2), 182-190.
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24101
dc.identifier.uri http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1813-6982.2003.tb01312.x/abstract
dc.description.abstract Wherever gambling activity is permitted it becomes a major competitor for the household budget.*(3) The growth in gambling in the US has become an important social and political issue and the subject of a National Commission, the National Gambling Impact Study Commission (NGISC 1999).*(4) The Commission indicates that more than 86 per cent of all Americans have gambled at least once and that over $50 bn. was spent (amount wagered minus prizes received) on gambling activities in the US in 1998. Lotteries accounted for 52 per cent of this in 1998, casinos 29 per cent and horse racing 7 per cent (NGICS Overview (1999): 72-75). In 1996 the gross revenues of all the organisations providing gambling or gaming opportunities in the US were estimated at $46.07 bn. or just under about 0.09 per cent of all private consumption expenditures for that year.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.source South African Journal of Economics
dc.source.uri http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1813-6982
dc.title Paying to play - the pricing policies of casinos
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2015-12-24T09:55:18Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Commerce en_ZA
dc.publisher.department School of Economics en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Barr, G. D. I., & Kantor, B. S. (2003). Paying to play - the pricing policies of casinos. <i>South African Journal of Economics</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24101 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Barr, G D I, and B S Kantor "Paying to play - the pricing policies of casinos." <i>South African Journal of Economics</i> (2003) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24101 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Barr GDI, Kantor BS. Paying to play - the pricing policies of casinos. South African Journal of Economics. 2003; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24101. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Barr, G D I AU - Kantor, B S AB - Wherever gambling activity is permitted it becomes a major competitor for the household budget.*(3) The growth in gambling in the US has become an important social and political issue and the subject of a National Commission, the National Gambling Impact Study Commission (NGISC 1999).*(4) The Commission indicates that more than 86 per cent of all Americans have gambled at least once and that over $50 bn. was spent (amount wagered minus prizes received) on gambling activities in the US in 1998. Lotteries accounted for 52 per cent of this in 1998, casinos 29 per cent and horse racing 7 per cent (NGICS Overview (1999): 72-75). In 1996 the gross revenues of all the organisations providing gambling or gaming opportunities in the US were estimated at $46.07 bn. or just under about 0.09 per cent of all private consumption expenditures for that year. DA - 2003 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - South African Journal of Economics LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2003 T1 - Paying to play - the pricing policies of casinos TI - Paying to play - the pricing policies of casinos UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/24101 ER - en_ZA


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