Zero Proximity: Increasing the Online Visibility of Academics at the University of Mauritius

 

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dc.contributor.author Van Schalkwyk, François en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-07-24T09:59:46Z
dc.date.available 2014-07-24T09:59:46Z
dc.date.issued 2014-03 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Van Schalkwyk, F. 2014-03. Zero Proximity: Increasing the Online Visibility of Academics at the University of Mauritius. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/2335
dc.description.abstract On the airport approach road, an unsubtle pink billboard for T-Systems1 proclaims: "Zero Distance: The proximity to our customers." T-Systems is not T-Mobile (although they are probably cousins) but such is our neural wiring that the following thought is triggered: "Does anyone still use voicemail anymore?" Although empirical research is thin on the ground, there is evidence that shows that the use of voice-recorded messages on mobile phones decreased by 8% between July 2011 and July 2012. A possible explanation for the decline is the expectation that we are always connected, that we are never really o" the grid or disconnected from the network, no matter where we find ourselves. In T-terms, we live in a zero-proximity world. Traditional space-time boundaries have collapsed in a globalised world, and this has garnered an unwavering expectation that any signal to make contact will be returned without delay. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.rights Attribution 4.0 International en_ZA
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en_ZA
dc.title Zero Proximity: Increasing the Online Visibility of Academics at the University of Mauritius en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.rights.holder © SCAP, University of Cape Town 2014. en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town. Scholarly Communication in Africa Programme en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Van Schalkwyk, F. (2014). Zero Proximity: Increasing the Online Visibility of Academics at the University of Mauritius. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/2335 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Van Schalkwyk, François "Zero Proximity: Increasing the Online Visibility of Academics at the University of Mauritius." (2014) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/2335 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Van Schalkwyk F. Zero Proximity: Increasing the Online Visibility of Academics at the University of Mauritius. 2014; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/2335. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Van Schalkwyk, François AB - On the airport approach road, an unsubtle pink billboard for T-Systems1 proclaims: "Zero Distance: The proximity to our customers." T-Systems is not T-Mobile (although they are probably cousins) but such is our neural wiring that the following thought is triggered: "Does anyone still use voicemail anymore?" Although empirical research is thin on the ground, there is evidence that shows that the use of voice-recorded messages on mobile phones decreased by 8% between July 2011 and July 2012. A possible explanation for the decline is the expectation that we are always connected, that we are never really o" the grid or disconnected from the network, no matter where we find ourselves. In T-terms, we live in a zero-proximity world. Traditional space-time boundaries have collapsed in a globalised world, and this has garnered an unwavering expectation that any signal to make contact will be returned without delay. DA - 2014-03 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town. Scholarly Communication in Africa Programme PY - 2014 T1 - Zero Proximity: Increasing the Online Visibility of Academics at the University of Mauritius TI - Zero Proximity: Increasing the Online Visibility of Academics at the University of Mauritius UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/2335 ER - en_ZA


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