My name is Afrika: Setswana genealogies, trans-atlantic interlocutions, and NOW-time in Keorapetse Kgositsile's life and work

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Samuelson, Meg en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Garuba, Harry en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Mkhize, Khwezi en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Phalafala, Portia Mahlodi en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2017-01-25T13:23:25Z
dc.date.available 2017-01-25T13:23:25Z
dc.date.issued 2016 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Phalafala, P. 2016. My name is Afrika: Setswana genealogies, trans-atlantic interlocutions, and NOW-time in Keorapetse Kgositsile's life and work. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/23022
dc.description.abstract South African poet laureate Keorapetse Kgositsile lived in extraordinary times marked by extraordinary challenges and changes. Born in 1938, exactly a decade before the draconian apartheid regime came into power, his life and work emerge from the milieus of British colonial South Africa, apartheid South Africa, civil rights America, anti-apartheid movements, anti-colonial wars in Africa, anti-imperialism in Asia, cold war politics, and the eventual demise of both the Berlin wall and the apartheid regime in South Africa. His poetry responds to these times in illuminating ways. His poetic influences point to his Tswanacentred upbringing, his encounter with Afro-American oral and literary traditions, the styles and poetics of Drum writers, the outpouring of African literature he received from the Makerere conference of Uganda, and anti-colonial critical thinkers from Africa and its diaspora. At age twenty three, post-Sharpeville massacres, he was sent into exile by the leadership of the ANC, and he took with him a corpus of Tswana literature which would in/form his poetic. He readily immersed himself in the oral and written tradition of Afro-America while in exile in the United States of America. His work interweaves the oral and literary traditions of black South Africa and black America, revealing a dynamic and complex relationship between the two geographical sites. Where oral traditions have largely been left out of the broader narrative of modernity, this study demonstrates how oral traditions remain alive and are reinvigorated, providing a resource that is then carried across the Atlantic and renewed in translation, rather than left behind to ossify. Kgositsile's prominent presence in black international periodicals and his collaborations with other diasporic cultural, political and musical figures there show that the relationship between the two geographical sites is more complex than its current positioning of Afro-America as a vanguard on which Africans model themselves. Through a reading of Kgositsile's revolutionary poetry, this study also shows how the indigenous resource base enables him to resolve the agonising temporal and spatial tensions presented by modernity's colonialism. He coins concepts that re-enchant the world through a poetic that fosters a dialogue between past and future, and traditional and modern in a simultaneous present he deems the NOW-time. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Literary Studies en_ZA
dc.title My name is Afrika: Setswana genealogies, trans-atlantic interlocutions, and NOW-time in Keorapetse Kgositsile's life and work en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of English Language and Literature en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Phalafala, P. M. (2016). <i>My name is Afrika: Setswana genealogies, trans-atlantic interlocutions, and NOW-time in Keorapetse Kgositsile's life and work</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of English Language and Literature. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/23022 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Phalafala, Portia Mahlodi. <i>"My name is Afrika: Setswana genealogies, trans-atlantic interlocutions, and NOW-time in Keorapetse Kgositsile's life and work."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of English Language and Literature, 2016. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/23022 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Phalafala PM. My name is Afrika: Setswana genealogies, trans-atlantic interlocutions, and NOW-time in Keorapetse Kgositsile's life and work. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of English Language and Literature, 2016 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/23022 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Phalafala, Portia Mahlodi AB - South African poet laureate Keorapetse Kgositsile lived in extraordinary times marked by extraordinary challenges and changes. Born in 1938, exactly a decade before the draconian apartheid regime came into power, his life and work emerge from the milieus of British colonial South Africa, apartheid South Africa, civil rights America, anti-apartheid movements, anti-colonial wars in Africa, anti-imperialism in Asia, cold war politics, and the eventual demise of both the Berlin wall and the apartheid regime in South Africa. His poetry responds to these times in illuminating ways. His poetic influences point to his Tswanacentred upbringing, his encounter with Afro-American oral and literary traditions, the styles and poetics of Drum writers, the outpouring of African literature he received from the Makerere conference of Uganda, and anti-colonial critical thinkers from Africa and its diaspora. At age twenty three, post-Sharpeville massacres, he was sent into exile by the leadership of the ANC, and he took with him a corpus of Tswana literature which would in/form his poetic. He readily immersed himself in the oral and written tradition of Afro-America while in exile in the United States of America. His work interweaves the oral and literary traditions of black South Africa and black America, revealing a dynamic and complex relationship between the two geographical sites. Where oral traditions have largely been left out of the broader narrative of modernity, this study demonstrates how oral traditions remain alive and are reinvigorated, providing a resource that is then carried across the Atlantic and renewed in translation, rather than left behind to ossify. Kgositsile's prominent presence in black international periodicals and his collaborations with other diasporic cultural, political and musical figures there show that the relationship between the two geographical sites is more complex than its current positioning of Afro-America as a vanguard on which Africans model themselves. Through a reading of Kgositsile's revolutionary poetry, this study also shows how the indigenous resource base enables him to resolve the agonising temporal and spatial tensions presented by modernity's colonialism. He coins concepts that re-enchant the world through a poetic that fosters a dialogue between past and future, and traditional and modern in a simultaneous present he deems the NOW-time. DA - 2016 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2016 T1 - My name is Afrika: Setswana genealogies, trans-atlantic interlocutions, and NOW-time in Keorapetse Kgositsile's life and work TI - My name is Afrika: Setswana genealogies, trans-atlantic interlocutions, and NOW-time in Keorapetse Kgositsile's life and work UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/23022 ER - en_ZA


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