Household economies of low-income, African female-headed households in Khayelitsha: intergenerational support, negotiation and conflict

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Moore, Elena en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Button, Kirsty Allen en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2017-01-20T07:48:53Z
dc.date.available 2017-01-20T07:48:53Z
dc.date.issued 2016 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Button, K. 2016. Household economies of low-income, African female-headed households in Khayelitsha: intergenerational support, negotiation and conflict. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22841
dc.description.abstract Low-income, African female-headed households represent a large segment of households in South Africa. Despite this, little is known about how financial and non-financial resources are provided, controlled and used within these households. Less is known about how these dynamics shape intergenerational relationships and positions of power within female-headed households. This thesis aims to contribute to a better understanding of these issues by examining how the household economies of fourteen low-income, African female-headed households in Khayelitsha operated on a day-to-day basis. It also sought to understand how two generations of household members experienced these practices. Through the collection and analysis of qualitative data, this thesis shows that the households were sites of support as household members relied on each other for various forms of support. However, many of the female household heads bore the greatest responsibility for the physical and financial maintenance of their households. Furthermore, the findings build upon existing understandings of low-income, multi-generational households as also being sites of negotiation and contestation. The unequal burden of care experienced by the older women and the patterns of support provided by other household members was often the outcome of intergenerational negotiation. The participants' experiences of these dynamics shed light on the shifting positions of power within their households. The older women struggled to maintain their authority and negotiate for financial and practical assistance from their younger household members. As a result, the provision of support and perceptions about their interpersonal relationships were framed by experiences of intergenerational conflict and feelings of ambivalence. The findings highlight experiences of multi-generational family life and inequality in a context where feelings of obligation, broader socio-economic conditions and the nature of state support may constrain how the participants were able to provide support and handle instances of intergenerational conflict. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Sociology en_ZA
dc.title Household economies of low-income, African female-headed households in Khayelitsha: intergenerational support, negotiation and conflict en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Sociology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MSocSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Button, K. A. (2016). <i>Household economies of low-income, African female-headed households in Khayelitsha: intergenerational support, negotiation and conflict</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Sociology. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22841 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Button, Kirsty Allen. <i>"Household economies of low-income, African female-headed households in Khayelitsha: intergenerational support, negotiation and conflict."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Sociology, 2016. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22841 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Button KA. Household economies of low-income, African female-headed households in Khayelitsha: intergenerational support, negotiation and conflict. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Sociology, 2016 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22841 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Button, Kirsty Allen AB - Low-income, African female-headed households represent a large segment of households in South Africa. Despite this, little is known about how financial and non-financial resources are provided, controlled and used within these households. Less is known about how these dynamics shape intergenerational relationships and positions of power within female-headed households. This thesis aims to contribute to a better understanding of these issues by examining how the household economies of fourteen low-income, African female-headed households in Khayelitsha operated on a day-to-day basis. It also sought to understand how two generations of household members experienced these practices. Through the collection and analysis of qualitative data, this thesis shows that the households were sites of support as household members relied on each other for various forms of support. However, many of the female household heads bore the greatest responsibility for the physical and financial maintenance of their households. Furthermore, the findings build upon existing understandings of low-income, multi-generational households as also being sites of negotiation and contestation. The unequal burden of care experienced by the older women and the patterns of support provided by other household members was often the outcome of intergenerational negotiation. The participants' experiences of these dynamics shed light on the shifting positions of power within their households. The older women struggled to maintain their authority and negotiate for financial and practical assistance from their younger household members. As a result, the provision of support and perceptions about their interpersonal relationships were framed by experiences of intergenerational conflict and feelings of ambivalence. The findings highlight experiences of multi-generational family life and inequality in a context where feelings of obligation, broader socio-economic conditions and the nature of state support may constrain how the participants were able to provide support and handle instances of intergenerational conflict. DA - 2016 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2016 T1 - Household economies of low-income, African female-headed households in Khayelitsha: intergenerational support, negotiation and conflict TI - Household economies of low-income, African female-headed households in Khayelitsha: intergenerational support, negotiation and conflict UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22841 ER - en_ZA


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